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WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 4867 00650 2365 




®fje JWtrror 

1934 




SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



Wal. Ref. 

EDUCATION 

1934 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/mirrorwalthamhig1934walt 



Middlesex Electric 
Supply Co. 

A Complete 
ELECTRICAL STORE 
Headquarters for 
NORGE 

FRIGID AIRE 

SERVEL 
REFRIGERATORS 

689 Main Street 
Waltham, Mass. 

Tel. Wal. 0437 



Compliments of 

J. M. Quinn 



^:>-^''l«»<>-B»u.| 



*f 



O'TOOLE 

Florist 

719 Main St., Waltham, Mass. 
North Avenue, Weston, Mass. 

Tel. Wal. 2961 



Compliments of 



W. H. Nichols 



44 Woerd Avenue 






China, Dinner Ware, Glass, 
Kitchen Furnishings 

C. F. Hunt Co. 

HORACE E. WALLIS 

685 Main Street 
Walthain, Mass. 

Tel. Wal. 2390 



i* — 



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Read & White 

111 Summer St., Boston 
93 Massachusetts Ave. 



Compliments of 

Joseph Trombley 

601 Main Street 



TUXEDOS— CAPS & GOWNS 
New Low Kates 



"THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST" 

This applies to coal just the same as to all kinds of 
merchandise. We handle only the best grades. 

Clean Coal, Careful Teamsters, Prompt Delivery 

WALTHAM COAL COMPANY 

Established 1872 
Telephone Waltham 0116 



■*j 



Waltham Candy 
Shop 



■0-^M-r)-^»o-aM»-0-^»<>-«»-(>-^»o-aH»<>-«»<>'aH»><)<«M>n-«».o-^»-n-«^<i.vi».(>-« 



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I f 

I BILLS FISH MARKET f 

! , ! 

! and I 

j OYSTER BAR j 

] WALTHAM'S RELIABLE FISH MARKET j 

j 793 Main Street Waltham, Mass. I 

Telephone Waltham 0707 

| WILLIAM SLATER, Proprietor j 

I i 

j Fried Clams — French Fried Potatoes { 

i 

I i 

i ! 

i i 

j i 

j George S. Abrahamson j 

j Registered Druggist j 

Successor to i 

GEORGE 0. CARTER j 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO THE COM- 
POUNDING OF PHYSICIANS PRESCRIPTIONS 

PURE DRUGS AND CHEMICALS j 

j 342 MOODY STREET | 

j WALTHAM, MASS. I 

j Tel. Waltham 0252 I 

i J 

I I 

i i 

! Schnapp's Chocolate Shop ! 

83 BROWN STREET WALTHAM j 

I "You Will Not Know the Best I 

| Until You Have Had | 

Schnapp's" 

Tel. Waltham 1138-M j 

I i 



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| In the Long Run.. | 

i i 

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j you and your friends will j 

prize the portrait that looks 

like you — your truest self, 

{ free from stage effects and I 

little conceits. 



It is in this "long run" pho- 
tography that PURDY suc- 
| cess has been won. 



I 



Portraiture by the camera 

that one cannot laugh at or j 

| cry over in later years. 



I For the present pleasure and 

future pride protect your 

j photographic self by having I 

PUKDY make the portraits. 

i 1 

i 1 

i I 

I PURDY j 

I ! 

j 160 TREMONT STREET BOSTON j 

| Official photographer, Waltham High School ji 

Class of 1934 ; 

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| j 



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W$t jWtrror 

1934 



Waltham High School 

Class Poem 

Arthur N. Burke, Principal 

Class Statistics 

Class History 

Who's Who 

Senior Play Cast 

Class Prophecy 

Class Motto 

Last Will and Test2ment 



Frederic Joslyn 



Richard Lyon 



Harold Burke 

Raymond Tenant y 

Armand P. La Rosee 



NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 



DAY DIVISION 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEEBING 

Co-operating with engineering firms, offers 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree in the following branches 
of engineering: 

Civil Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Co-operating with business firms, offers 
courses leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in the following fields of busi- 
ness: 

Accounting 

Banking and Finance 

Business Management 



The Co-operative Plan combines technical theory with the equivalent of two years of practical ex- 
perience. It enables the student to earn his tuition and a part of his other school expenses. 



EVENING DIVISION 

(For Men and Women) 

Providing complete courses of university grade, in business and law, for high school graduates who 
find it necessary to work during the day but wish to study for further advancement. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Specializes in accounting and business ad- 
ministration under instructors actually en- 
gaged in the business that they teach. 
73% of graduates hold major executive 
positions in business. Outstandingly suc- 
cessful in C. P. A. examinations. 

School grants B. B. A. and M. B. A. de- 
grees. Individual courses also available to 
special students. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

LL. B. degree. 
Four-year course. 

Prepares for bar examinations and practice. 
Case method of instruction similar to that 
in best day law schools. 

A School of high standards adapted to the 
needs of employed men and women. 

Alumni outstanding successful as lawyers, 
judges, business executives. 



Graduates of Walt ham High School may be admitted without examinations if grades are satisfactory 

to the Department of Admissions. 

Catalog's or further information sent upon request 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



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I THE MIRROR, 1934 



VOL. XXV 



Waltham, Mass., Graduation Number, 1933-1934 



No. 2 



'=to fjolb, ag 'ttoere tfce mirror up to nature* 

Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii. 



Editorial Staff 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Raymond Tenanty 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

Clifford Curtis 



ASS'T. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard Blake 



ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGER 
Paul Butman 



ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Albert Perna 



ASS'T. ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Barbara Risdon 
Robert Cutting Blanche McKenney 



EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Frederic Joslyn 



BOOKS EDITOR 

Ruth Whittemore 



MUSIC EDITOR 

Edith Stearns 



ART EDITOR 

Victor Joos 



Judith Waterhouse (Girls) 



SPORT EDITORS 



Vincent Bryson (Boys) 



JOKE EDITOR 
Hilding Kruse 



ASS'T. JOKE EDITOR 

Adeline Fish 



STAFF SECRETARY 
Helen Haley 



LITERARY EDITORS 



Harold Burke 
Dagmar Bistrup 
Charles Gamble 
Nancy Smith 
Betty Wyman 
Esther Mehring 
Richard Profita 



Jean Lincoln 
Franklin Davis 
Harold Pope 
Carleton Hastings 
Ptolemy Adams 
Robert Power 



Literary Department 
Business Department 
Art Department 



FACULTY ADVISERS 



Miss Ober 
Miss Callanan 
Miss Burgess 



PRINTED AT THE WALTHAM TRADE SCHOOL 






»■<"*■»■ i H»i >«W-0-^»m >*■»-( !-»».< i-^B»-<i-«»-<H 



ONCE High School Scholars 

NOW Grandfathers, Fathers, Sons and Grandsons. 

For over 80 years, from generation to generation, 
families in this community have been regular de- 
positors in our Bank. 




DEPOSITS (April 9, 1934) $ 9,680,227.38 
RESERVES 10,897,752.53 

WALTHAM SAVINGS BANK 

702 MAIN STREET, WALTHAM, MASS. 



v i 



SAVE SYSTEMATICALLY 



FROM $1.00 — $40.00 WITH THE 



WALTHAM COOPERATIVE BANK 



"V«»U^P»04^»-O^W- '>-«■»-<<• 



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THE MIRROR, 1934 




mmKOBBtBKSBB 



WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



CLASS POEM 

Like Roman Janus here we stand, twofold, 
And silent muse on years now closed fore'er. 
With solemn mien we shut those doors of gold 
And end the past, of high-school years so fair. 
But 'tis no time to grieve or idle be. 
More weighty things than these come to the fore. 
For looking forward now great things we see; 
We ope the gates, press onward evermore. 
For life, a vista long and twisting, winds 
From temple steps to places dark and dim. 
With fear, but with undaunted, hopeful minds, 
We follow Truth and Wisdom, God's own glim. 
And therefore, friends, we start anew and fresh, 
To weave the tapestry of Life, no less. 

Frederic Joslyn. 



THE MIKROE, 1934 




ARTHUR N. BURKE, Principal 



THE M I 11 II K , 1934 



HELEN LOUISE ADAMS 

"Kiddo" 
Hiking, Swimming, Skating (1) 
To get there (2) 
Sleep until 3 every day (3) 
Honor Roll, 1 ; Commercial Club, 

3; Social Service Committee, 

3 (4) 



EVY ANDERSON 



SHIRLEY RUTH ANDREWS 
"Charlotte" 

Dancing (1) 

Salem Normal (2) 

School Teacher (3) 

Candy Girl, 3 ; Member on Com- 
mittee, 3 ; Dramatic Club Mem- 
ber, 2, (4) 



HELEN ROSE BALLANTINE 
"Blondy" or "Boots" 

Crossword puzzles ( 1 ) 

My Ohio Home (2) 

To go to Heaven on a mule and 
to be a successful lawyer (3) 

Bowling, Baseball, Baseball, 1 ; 
Bowling, 2 ; Honor Roll, Bowl- 
ing, Clubs, Com. Work, 3, (4) 



CHRISTOPHER BEATTIE 
"Chris" 

Walking (1) 

Business (2) 

Success (3) 

Basketball, 2, 3; Football, 3; 
Stage Committee, 3 ; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 (4) 




INA LAURA ADCOCK 
"Red" 

Playing the piano ( 1 ) 

Just a Cottage Small (2) 

To own a powerful car and 
travel (3) 

Honor Roll, Bowling, 1 ; Honor 
Roll, Bowling, Commercial 
Club, 2 ;Honor Roll, Commer- 
cial Club, 3 ; Committee Work, 
Bowling (4) 



VERNA LILLIAN ANDERSON 
"Andy" 

Talking (1) 

Framingham State Teachers' Col- 
lege (2) 

School Ma'm (3) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; On Commit- 
tee for Patrons at Senior Play, 
3, (4) 



ANNA ANNUNZIATA 
"Curly" or "Firecracker" 

Singing — Dancing ( 1 ) 

Heaven? (2) 

Walk and see more (3) 

Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 
3; Commercial Club, 3, (4) 



2, 



GERALD BAUMANN 
"Jerry" 

Playing golf (1) 

Business magnate (2) 

To get a steady job (3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 
2, 3; Track, 2, 3; Senior Play, 
3 ; Magazine agent, 3 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (4) 



FREDA BELKIN 
"Fritzie" 

Sports ( 1 ) 

I'll Follow you (2) 

To go out with the Man in the 
Moon (3) 

Class Team in Hockey, Bowling, 
Basketball, and Baseball, 1, 2, 
3 ; Jr. Social Com., 2 ; Varsity 
Basketball, 2, 3; Commercial 
Club Dance Com., 3 ; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



MARY LEE BETTINGER 

Sketching (1) 

Syracuse University (2) 

To be an artist (3) 

Hockey, 1, 2; Varsity, 2; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; Bowling, 1, 2; Base- 
ball, 1, 2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2 
(4) 



FLORENCE BICKFORD 

"Fonnie" 
Tennis, Dancing (1) 
The sky's the limit (2) 
To buy Joe Penner's Duck (3) 
Baseball, 1 ; Hockey, 1, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 2; Commercial Club, 3; 

Stage Committee, 3 ; Football, 

Usher, 3 (4) 



MARIE BOULTON 

"Red" 
Chewing gum ( 1 ) 
Boston University (2) 
Laboratory Chemist (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1, 3; Candy Girl at Senior 

Play, 3 (4) 



ROBERT BOWMAN 

"Bob" "Butch" 
Sitting in the moonlight (1) 
No place like home (2) 
No ambition — Ceaser was killed 

for being ambitious (3) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3; Golf, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 1, 

2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



JOHN WM. BRESNAHAN 
"Shadow" 

Eating ( 1 ) 

A Boston Paper and City Hall 
(2) 

To become a good printer, and 
to emulate Cicero (3) 

First Ass. Editor of The Trade 
Broadcaster; Class sports, 1, 2, 
3 ; Class Speaker for Gradua- 
tion ; President of Student 
Council ; Representative for 
Class Day Exercises (4) 




HELENE BETTS 

"Betsy" "Minerva" 
Rube (1) 
Maine (2) 
Married life (3) 
Bowling, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 2, 3; 

Honor Roll, 1 ; Mirror Agent, 

1 (4) 



PETER BOGERT 

"Pete" 
Rifles, Tennis, Swimming (1) 
If Nellson's is Heaven then mine 

is H— 1 (2) 
Navy Aviator, to see Heath 

study (3) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



JAMES BONOMO 

"Jimmie" 
Driving fast cars ( 1 ) 
Bermuda (2) 
Become a successful business 

man (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Basketball, 

2, 3 (4) 



CAROLYN BREHM 

"Cal" 

Dancing (1) 

Emerson (2) 

To be an actress (3) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Varsity, 2, 3; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 
3 ; Varsity, 1 ; Dramatic Club, 
1, 2; Senior play cast; Bowl- 
ing, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



MARY BRITT 

"Med" 
Sewing (to make my wings to 

get there) (1) 
Heaven (via my wings) (2) 
To be a Nun (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2 ; Senior Clubs, 

3 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



MERTON BRODRICK 

"Mutt" 
Getting out of sessions (1) 
Embassy Theatre, June 7(2) 
To see a show free of charge (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Hockey, 2, 

3; Band, 1 (4) 



JANE BROWN 

"Janie" 
Drawing (1) 
Boothbay, Maine (2) 
To go to Vesper George School 

of Art (3) 



MARJORIE BURDETT 
"Marge" 

Riding; M. V. S. (1) 

Chamberlain (2) 

Store Executive (3) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2; Hockey, 1, 
2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Hock- 
ey Manager, 2; Baseball, 1, 2; 
Varsity Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Varsity Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Bowl- 
ing, 1, 2 (4) 

HAROLD L. BURKE 

"Bud- 
Trying to be as big a fruit as Joe 

Keane (1) 
Park Burlesque (2) 
To out-curve Mae West (3) 
Class Prophet, 3 ; Dramatic Club 
Vice-President, 3 ; Chairman of 
Class Day, 3 ; Senior Play Cast, 
3 ; Dramatic Club Broadcasts, 
3 ; Winner of Fiction Prize, 1 ; 
Mirror Staff, 1, 2, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club 
Play Committee, 3 (4) 

GARDNER L. BURT 
"Gardie" "Burt" 

Getting G. L. W.(ard's ) goat 
(not hard) (1) 

Mass. State (2) 

Business (Monkey?) (3) 

Prom Committee, 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 3 ; Dramatic Club Play, 
3 ; Senior Play Lead, 3 ; Radio 
Broadcast of Dramatic Club, 3 ; 
Junior Prom, 2 (4) 




JAMES BROWN 

"Brownie" 
Wine, women, and song, poker 

(1) 

Any place where it's warm (2) 
To be a lazy millionaire (3) 
Junior Prom Com., 2 ; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3; Track, 3 (4) 



RICHARD BUCKLEY 

"Dick" "Buck" 
Music (1) 

N. E. Conservatory of Music (2) 
To be a music supervisor (3) 
Orchestra — Band, 1, 2, 3; Track, 

2 (4) 



HOWARD JAMES BURGESS 

"Howie" "Mickey" 
Tramping, Dogs ( 1 ) 
Mass. State Agr. College (2) 
Dairy Farmer (3) 



EDWARD BURNS 

"Burnsie" 
Laughing at Ringrose ( 1 ) 
Boston University (2) 
Macbeth was ambitious and 

what he got (3) 
Football, 2, 3; Basketball, 

(4) 



look 



2, 3 



HENRY J. CARDONE 

"Herico," "Pasquale" "Cara- 

mondia" 
To Sleep (1) 
Long live "Italy" (2) 
"To "Bring 'em Back Alive!" The 

women" (3) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



JOHN P. CARRUTHERS 

"Giny" 
Collecting French post cards ( 1 ) 
Africa (2) 

Hitch-hiking to Africa (3) 
Ping-pong; Football, 1, 2 (4) 



ROBERT CATALDO 

"Bob" 
Gardening, Mowing Lawn ( 1 ) 
Dartmouth (2) 
Chief Justice U. S. Supreme 

Court (3) 
Football, 1 ; Class Officer, 1, 2, 

3 (4) 



THERESA CHIAFARO 
"Tessie" "Bananas" 

Walking, Skipping, Drawing pe- 
riods ( 1 ) 

Florida (2) 

Mortician ( 3 ) 

Honor Roll, 3 (4) 



RICHARD CLARK 

"Clarkie" 
Collecting old coins (l) 
To be a well-known politician 

(2) 
To go to Newfoundland (3) 
Football, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; 

Baseball, 2, 3 ; Commercial 

Club, 2, 3; Work at Lunch 

Counter, 2, 3 (4) 



ALPHONSE WM. COLLURA, 3 
"Fofo" "Cannonball" Slaug- 
therhouse" 

Bumming anything that can be 
bummed ( 1 ) 

It isn't Water St. it's Bridgeton 
Academy (2) 

To spend the rent money on a 
gal (3) 

Track Team, 1, 2, 3; Football, 2, 
3 ; Trade School Varsity Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; All-Scholastic in 
Football, 1, 2; Waltham Alum- 
ni Football Team, 3, 4 (4) 




THELMA CARVILLE 

"Thel" 
Chewing Gum ( 1 ) 
Europe (2) 
Travel (3) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 

3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 

ball, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



1, 2. 
Base- 



ROBERT CHAMPION 

"Champ" 
Collecting Butterflies ( 1 ) 
To get abroad (2) 
To dodge work ( 3 ) 
Senior Play Committee, 3 (4) 



ERNEST L. CIARLETTA 
"Ernday" 

Eating ( 1 ) 

Who knows ( 2 ) 

To be a typographer (3) 

Varsity Basketball, 2, 3; Inter- 
class Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Re- 
porter of Trade Broadcaster, 3 ; 
Student Council, 2; Golf, 3; 
Printed the March issue of The 
Daily Reminder, 1933; The 
Daily Reminder for April, 1934 
(4) 



WALDO H. CLARK 

"Chizzy" "Fatso" "Watso" 

Short wave radio work ( 1 ) 

Anywhere where work is obtain- 
able (2) 

To get an Amateur Radio Oper- 
ator's license (3) 

Basketball, 2, 3 (4) 



RAYMOND CORMIER 

"Starky" 
Fishing, Hunting (1) 
Hawaiian Islands (2) 
Structural Engineer (3) 
Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



1, 2: 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



ELSIE CARSON 

"Featherhead" (can't lose it) 

"Blondy" (preferred) 
Dancing, Swimming Listening 

to Voice of Experience ( 1 ) 
California, Here I Come (2) 
To find that "nasty man" (3) 
Commercial Club, 3; Football 

Usher, 3 ; Baseball, 1 ; Honor 

Roll, 2; Basketball, 2, 3 (4) 



ROSALIE CRON 

"Ro" 
Dancing ( 1 ) 
God only knows (2) 
Travel (3) 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; Basketball, 

1; Hockey, 1; Honor Roll, 1, 

2, 3 (4) 



MADALINE G. CURRAN 

"Maddie" 
Swimming (l) 
Framingham (2) 
To be a dietition (3) 
Field Hockey, 1, 2; Basketball, 2; 

Honor Roll, 2, 3 (4) 



DOMINIC CUSANO 

"Dom" 
Necking (l) 
My girl's house (2) 
Buck Farmer (3) 
Football, 2, 3; Basketball, 

Track, 2, 3 (4) 



HAROLD DAVIS 




FRANCIS COUGHLAN 

"Red" 
Necking ( 1 ) 
Boston (2) 
Hick farmer (3) 
Hockey, 2, 3 (4) 



AURETA CUNNIFFE 

"Rita" 
Hairdressing (1) 
The wide, wide world ( 2 ) 
To finish high school (3) 
Football Usher, 3 ; Commercial 

Club, 3 (4) 



CLIFFORD CURTIS 

"Cliff- 
Sports (1) 
Mass. State (2) 
To be an executive in a large 

business concern (3) 
Mirror Staff, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 

3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 

3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



ELIZABETH CUSHMAN 

"Libby" 
Collecting match folders (1) 
To be a buyer ( 3 ) 
Bowling, 1 ; Picture Committee, 

3 ; Senior Play Committee, 3 ; 

Senior Play Candy Committee 

Chairman, 3 (4) 



HILDA DAY 
"Duckey" 

Collecting souvenirs (l) 

Hospital (2) 

To be a nurse in different coun- 
tries ( 3) 

Baseball, 2, 3 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



MARIE DELFINO 

"Tarzan" 
Baseball, Reading ( 1 ) 
Mars in a Rocket (2) 
Professional Dishwasher (3) 
Commercial Club, 3; Bowling, 

Baseball, 3 (4) 



ARTHUR DERBYSHIRE, JR. 

"Derby" 
Tennis (l) 

Bentley School of Accounting (2) 
To become a C. P. A. ( 3 ) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Orchestra, 

1, 2 (4) 



GEORGE DOLBER 

None 
Sports (1) 
Rensselaer (2) 
Aeronautical Engineer (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



WILFRED J. DUFRESNE 

"Big Shot" 
Notes and Books on Astronomy 

(1) 
First mate of sergeant (2) 
Navy or Marines (3) 



BEULAH EDWARDS 
"Sissy" 

Professional baseball (1) 

New York (2) 

Traveling (3) 

Senior Play Committee, 3 ; Base- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3; Tennis, 2, 3; Football Usher, 
2, 3; Hockey, 2, 3; Class 
Hockey, 3 (4) 




THERESA E. DEMARCO 
"Teddy" 

Experimental Gardening (1) 

Janitor's office (2) 

To work up to the top floor ( 3 ) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Entertain- 
ment Committee, 3 ; Mr. Good- 
rich's Secretary, 3 ; Honor F.oll, 
1, 2, 3 (4) 



FRANCIS DINSMORE 

"Red" "Snuffer" "Dins" 
Buying butts (1) 
To heaven (2) 
Get out of this school (3) 



MILLICENT DRAPER 

"Billie" 
Haven't got one (2) 
To get a position when I leave 

school (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Honor Roll, 

3; Tennis, 3 (4) 



WILLIAM EATON 

"Bill" 
M. S. C. (2) 
To succeed (3) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 

3 (4) 



CLINTON ELDRIDGE 

"Sonny" "Clint" 
"Tootin" the sax (1) 
Where they have softer and more 

seductive sofas (2) 
To play a season at the Totem 

Pole (3) 
Junior Prom Committee, 2 ; Track 

Team, 2 ; Honor Roll, 1 ; Senior 

Play Stage Committee, 3; (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIR ROE, 1934 



GEORGE ELLIS 
"El" 

Women (1) 

Behind the swinging doors (2) 

Not to get caught (3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Football Cap- 
tain, 3 ; Athletic Committee, 3 : 
Senior Play Committee, 3 ; 
Class Day Committee, 3 (4) 



JAMES FAULKNER 

"Bimmy" "Jimmy" 
Skating, Timing Fords ( 1 ) 
St. Pete and L. A., 1934-35 (2) 
To get away from Rooms 9 and 

19 (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Treasurer 

Nazi Club, 3; Monitor, 1 (4) 



RUSSELL FERRO 

"Russ" 
Walking — 8 miles per day ( 1 ) 
Kelly Field, Texas (2) 
To become a pilot (i ) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3 (4) 



DERWOOD FROST 

"Dewey" 
Music (1) 
College (2) 

To graduate from college (3) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; 

Social Committee, 1 ; Golf, 3 ; 

Basketball, 3 (4) 



CLEMENT GALLAGHER 

"Gal- 
Baseball (1) 
Braves Field (2) 
To see the world (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 




JIMMY FAHEY 
"Babe" "Slugger" 

Swedes ( 1 ) 

Pumping Station, Roberts (2) 

To get married? (3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Vice 
President, 3; IV G Sportlight 
Magazine, 3 ; Senior Play Com- 
mittee, 3; Hockey, 1 (4) 



LEON FERNALD 

"Doc" 
Wine, Women, and Song (1) 
Medical School (2) 
Surgeon (3) 
Track, 2, 3 ; Dramatic Club Play 

Cast, 3 ; Senior Play Cast, 3 

(4) 



HARLAN P. FLEMING 

"Harlem" 
To drive big cars ( 1 ) 
Boston Garden (2) 
To be Goalie of Bruins (3) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; 

Track, 3 ; Football, 3 ; Band, 

1, 2, 3 (4) 



DOROTHY FURBUSH 

"Dot" 
Doing things ! ( 1 ) 
I'll guess with you (2) 
To get an A in French (3) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 
2,3; Varsity Hockey Capt., 2; 
Bowling, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3; Track, 1, 2, 3; Soph. Social 
Com. Dram. Club, 1,2,3; Sec. 
of Dram. Club, 3 ; Jr. Prom. 
Com., Sr. Dance Com., Sec. and 
Treas., 2, 3; Sr. Play Cast, 
Class Play Com., (4) 



THOMAS GALLAGHER 

"Tom" "Gal" 
Sitting in the moonlight (1) 
God knows where! (2) 
Get a $50 a week job (3) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 

3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



CHARLES GAMBLE 

"Chilly" 
Music, Chewing Gum, not doing 

my Latin ( 1 ) 
Tufts (2) 

To marry a rich heiress (3) 
Band, 1, 2; Basketball, 2, 3; 

"Mirror" Staff, 3; Senior Play 

Committee, 3 (4) 



ELDEAN GIBSON 

"Deany" 
Going places (1) 
My little grass space in Keolakua 

( 2 ) 
To hear the banjoes playing on 

the beach of Hononare ( 3 ) 

Commercial Club, 2, 3; Social 

Service Committee, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



LENA GIORDANI 

"Lee" 
Dancing, going places ( 1 ) 
I'll meet you there (2) 
To take a holiday with death (3) 
Commercial Club (4) 



HELEN HALEY 
"Cris" 

Hiking (1) 

Holland (2) 

To have a white car and a black 
chauffeur (3) 

Soph. Honor Roll, 1 ; Jr. Honor 
Roll, 2 ; Assoc. Member Com- 
bercial Club, 2 ; Chairman of 
Social Service Committee of 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Secretary 
of "Mirror" Staff, 3; Honor 
Roll, 3 (4) 



JOSEPHINE HAMILTON 

"Jo" "Shrimp" 
Elocution lessons (l) 
N. E. Conservatory of Music (2' 
To be a good piano player ( 3 ) 
Baseball, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 

(4) 




AUGUSTA GARDINER 

"Gussie" 
Movies — Walking ( 1 ) 
Hollywood (2) 
Make Clarke Gable (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 



ROLAND GIBSON 

"Gibby" 
Bits of everything (1) 
Unknown and unlimited 
Travel (3) 



(2) 



LILLIAN GREENE 

"Lillums" 
Doin' things ( 1 ) 
My little grass shack in Hawaii 

(2) 
To find Gracie Allen's lost 

brother (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2; Commercial 

Club, 3 (4) 



EDWARD HAMILTON 

"Heddie" 
Sleeping (1) 
Waverley (2) 

To be a Typographic Expert (3) 
Baseball, Basketball (4) 



THYRA HANSON 
"Pint" 

Dancing ( 1 ) 

New York City (2) 

A good dancer (3) 

Junior Prom Committee, 2 ; Com- 
mercial Club (Alumni Com.). 
3; Senior Play Committee, 3 
(4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIEROR, 19 34 



LAWRENCE HARRIGAN 
"Hurricane" 

Blondes (1) 

Heaven ( 2 ) 

Make Fahey take Physics (3) 
Golf, 1, 2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3; 
Baseball, 1; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 
2, 3 ; Chairman Junior Social, 
2; Vice President of Class, 1, 
2 ; Chairman of Picture Com- 
mittee, 3 (4) 



MARGARET HARRIS 

"Margy" "Miggie" 
Music; Piano and Clarinet (1) 
Radcliffe (2) 
To Travel (3) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Senior Play 

Candy Committee, 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



CLARA HASLAM 

"Kitten" 
Collecting silver paper ( 1 ) 
Washington, D. C. (2) 
Private Secretary to the President 

(3) 
Honor Roll, 2; Basketball, 2, 3; 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 



JENNIE HEBERT 
"Jenny" 

Music ( 1 ) 

Unknown ( 2 ) 

Play the piano (3) 

Honor Roll, 3 ; Member of Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (4) 



MARY HOARDE 

"Hoardie" 
Talking (1) 
Lord only knows (2) 
Chief Cook and Bottle Washer 

(3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Honor Roll, 

L3 (4) 




GRATIA HARRINGTON 
"Gra" 

Sports and Music ( 1 ) 

Colby Jr. College (2) 

Travel (3) 

Orchestra, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 3; 
Class Team, 3 ;Varsity, 3 ; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Class Team, 1, 
2, 3; Varsity, 1, 3; Bowling, 1, 

2, 3; Class Team, 1, 2, 3; 
Varsity, 1, 2, 3; Champion 
Bowler, 2; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; 
Class Team, 1, 3; Volley-ball, 

3, (4) 



CLYDE HARVEY 

"Curly" 
Sports ( 1 ) 
Outdoor life (2) 
Guiding (3) 



MARIAN HAYES 

"Mary Ann" "Blondie" 
Work (1) 
Business world (2) 
See the world (3) 
Picture Committee, 3 (4) 



HELEN DOROTHY HIBBARD 

"Hibby" 
Swimming (1) 
Wilfred Academy (2) 
Beauty Culturest (3) 



STEPHEN HODGE 
"Steve" 

Dancing, Horses, Yachting ( 1 ) 

Scott Carbee School of Art (2) 

Interior Decorator (3) 

Ticket Committee Senior Play, 3 ; 

Chairman of Patron and Patron- 
esses Committee, 3 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



ELIZABETH HORNBECK 
"Beth" 

Driving, Loafing, Walking ( 1 ) 
Europe (2) 
Optometrist ( 3 ) 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 



DOROTHA HUSTED 

"Dot" 
Music (1) 

Wait till I get one (2) 
Study music (3) 
Tennis, 3 ; Commercial Club, 3 

(4) 



DANA ELIZABETH JOHNSON 
"Diana" 

Swimming ( 1 ) 
Cooking School (2) 
To own a Tea Room (3) 
Orchestra, 3 ; Bowling, 2 ; Field 
Hockey, 1 (4) 



RUTH H. JOHNSON 
Collecting Toy Dogs (1) 
West (2) 
To Travel (3) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2 (4) 



FREDERIC JOSLYN 
"Fred" "Jossy" 

Counting money (my own prefer- 
ably) (1) 

Hollywood (during Chemistry 
periods) (2) 

To read "Anthony Adverse" (3) 

Band, 2, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3; Ex- 
change Editor of "Mirror" 3; 
Dramatic Club, 3; Class Day 
Committee, 3; Rep., Executive 
Board of Local F.ed Cross 
Chapter, 3 (4) 




PHILIP HURD 

"Phil- 
Golf (1) 
Looping (2) 

To visit Mclvor in Scotland (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Chairman of 
Soph Social, 1 ; Junior Prom 
Committee, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3; Baseball, 1; Nazi Club, 3; 
Chairman Alumni Com. (4) 



MARCELL J. IODICE 

"The Count" "Marey" 
To Heaven on a mule (1) 
India (2) 
To be Mayor of Waltham 



Art Club, 1, 2, ;■ 
Basketball, 1, 2, 



(3) 
Football, 1 
(4) 



HERBERT E. JOHNSON 

"Herb" 
Golf (1) 

As far as the train goes (2) 
Be a Captain in the Army (3) 
Nazi Club, 3 ; Monitor, 1 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (4) 



VICTOR J. JOOS 

"Vic" 

Going places ( 1 ) 

Around the world (2) 

To own a yacht (3) 

Football, 1, 3; Baseball, 1; Bas- 
ketball. 1, 2, 3; Senior Dance 
Committee, 3 ; Junior Prom 
Committee, 2 (4) 



MARGARET KANN 

"Peggy" 
None (1) 
Honolulu (2) 
To finish school (3) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



ERNEST R. KASWELL 
"Ernie" 

Music, Chemistry ( 1 ) 

P. G., thenM. I. T. (2) 

To be a cake of soap in Jean 
Harlow's bath tub (3) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Band, 6 yrs. 
Orchestra, 1 ; German Club, 3 
Prom Com., 2 ; Dance Com., 3 
Dramatic Club, 3 ; Radio Club, 
3 (4) 



THOMAS F. KELLEY 
„ F .. 

Sleeping (1) 

Mass. State College (2) 

Beat Fernald at matching (3) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Usher, 3 (4) 



HILDING G. KRUSE 

"Hechy" "Gunner" 
P.eading and loafing ( 1 ) 
Dartmouth — eventually if not 

now (2) 
Journalist (3) 
"Mirror" Staff, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



ARMAND LA ROSEE 
"Gus" 

Nooky (1) 

Poughkeepsie (2) 

Principal of W. H. S. (3) 

Football, 1, 2; Baseball, 3; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 ; Senior Play 
Committee, 3; Class Will, 3; 
Nazi Club, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; 
Track, 3 (4) 



VIRGINIA LASSMAN 

"Jinny" 
Walking (1) 
Normal School (2) 
Kindergarten Teacher ( 3 ) 
Basketball, 2, 3 (4) 




JOSEPH P. KEANE 
"Joe" "No Card" 

Golf, Tennis (1) 

Bemis Tech. (2) 

To be as big a fruit as Burke (3) 

Stage Manager, 3; "In the next 
Room", Class Day Committee, 
Dramatic Club Social Com. (4) 



FENTON G. I. KEYES 

"Iccy" 
Fun? (1) 
The farm (2) 
Pig-caller and general farm hand 

(3) 
Honor Roll, 1 ; Junior Prom 

Committee, 2 ; Basketball, 2 ; 

Baseball, 3 (4) 



FLORENCE LA CHAPELLE 

"Billie" 
Chattering ( 1 ) 
Lord only knows (2) 
Inventing newer and brighter 

nail polish (3) 
Baseball, 1 ; Commercial Club, 3 

(4) 



ROBERT F. LARSEN 

"Bob- 
Stamps, Coins, and Sports ( 1 ) 
Mass. College of Pharmacy (2) 
Chemist (3) 



Commercial 


Club, 2, 3; 


Basket- 


ball, 


1, 2, 


3 ; 


Band, 1 


; Senior 


Play 


Committee, 3 ; 


Honor 


Roll, 


1, 2 


3; 


Cartoon 


Club, 3 


(4) 











JEANNE LEMON 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



CHARLOTTE LITTLEFIELD 

"Char" 
Clothes — A man with blue eyes 

(1) 
Havana (2) 
To go up in an airplane (3) 



RICHARD LONG 

"Red" 
Beards (1) 
1,000,000 Dollars (2) 
To keep it ( 3 ) 
Basketball, 2, 3 (4) 



FRED LOPRESTI 

"Freddie" 
Dancing (l) 
To the big city (2) 
To become a great lover (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Nazi Club, 

3 (4) 



RICHARD LYON 

"Dick- 
Doing things (1) 
Where things are done (2) 
To do things (3.. 
Historian, Class Day Com., Golf, 

3 (4) 



ELEANOR G. MacDOUGAL 

"Snook" 
Tennis, Dancing (1) 
Dangerous Paradise (2) 
To ride Ed. Wynn's horse (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Commercial 
Club, 3; Football Usher, 3; 
Membership Committee, Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (4) 




ALBERT S. LOCKE 

"Al" 
Riding in rumble seat (La Salle) 

(1) 
Wentworth (2) 
To be a lithographer (3) 
Varsity Mgr. High School Foot- 
ball, 2, 3; Trade School, Var- 
sity Basketball Mgr., 2, 3; 
Chairman Trade School Dance 
Committee, Trade School Base- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



JOHN LOWELL 

"Johnnie" "Bud" 
Fishing (1) 
The Roundhouse (2) 
A Railroad Engineer (3) 



MARION A. LYDEN 

"Mitzi" 
Swimming (1) 
The Last Roundup ( 2 ) 
An Olympic Swimmer (3) 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 
1, 2, 3; Football Usher, 3; 
Candy Girl Senior Play, 3 ; 
Dramatic Club, 2 ; Com. Club, 
3 ; Picture Committee, 3 ; Var- 
sity, 2, 3 (4) 



NORMAN MacDONALD 
"Mac" 

Baseball (1) 

Oil Business (2) 

To make good ( 3 ) 

Weston High, 1 ; Treasurer and 
Secretary, 1 ; Football, 1, 2 ; 
Baseball, 1, 3; Junior Prom 
Committee, 2 ; Basketball, 2, 
3; Honor Roll, 2, 3 (4) 



JOHN MacIVOR 

"Scotty" 
Sleeping (1) 

Sing Sing Athletic College (2) 
To be honorary graduate of Sing 

Sing (3) 
Commercial Club, 3; Football, 1, 

2 ; Baseball, 1 ; Senior Play, 3 

(4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE IIREOR, 1934 



MERRILL MacLEOD 

"Mac" 
Shooting and drilling (1) 
South Sea Isles (2) 
To be a top Kick in Co. F. (3) 
Football, Baske'ball, Baseball (4) 



PAULINE MANNING 

"Pal" 
Dancing (1) 
White House (2) 
To be a Housewife ( 3 ) 



BERTHA A. MAJULIN 
"Bertie" "Minx" 

Annoying J. P. F. ( 1 ) 

China, to study sanitary conditions 
(2) 

To be a Child Psychologist (3) 

Honor Roll, 1, 3; Red Cross, 2, 
3; Football Usher, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2 (4) 



RUTH McINTOSH 
"Mac" 

Picking Petals off Daisies (1) 

Down Among the Carolines (2) 

To be a Fan Dancer (3) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Entertain- 
ment Committee, 3 ; Football 
Usher, 3 (4) 



ROBERT MEGSON 

"Bob" "Meggie" 
Sports and Radio ( 1 ) 
Basketball, 3 (4) 




FRANCES G. MAHONEY 

"Fran" 
Dramatics (1) 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital (2) 
To be a Radio Announcer ( 3 ) 
Monitor, 1; Dramatic Club, 2, 3; 
Dramatic Club President, 3 ; 
Dramatic Club Play Cast, 
Senior Play Cast, Red Cross Ex. 
Committee, 3 ; Radio Broad- 
casts, Class Day Comm. (4) 



JACOB MARCOU 
"Jake" "Yanko" 
Playing the Nigger Pool ( 1 ) 
To Heaven on a mule (2) 
To own Sing Sing ( 3 ) 



Basketball, 
3 (4) 



1, 2, 3 ; Cheerleader, 



LILLIAN McCAULEY 
"Irene" 

Sewing ( 1 ) 

Who knows? (2) 

To do the Carioca and to Travel 
(3) 

Honor Roll, 1 ; Commercial Club 
Member, 2 ; Commercial Club, 
3 ; Chairman Membership Com- 
mittee, 3 (4) 



ANNA LOUISE MEAD 
Dramatics ( 1 ) 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital (2) 
To see Spain and London ( 3 ) 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Class Day 
Committee, 3 ; Prompter, Senior 
Play, 3 (4) 



JAMES A MIANI 

"Minnie" 
Rabbits and Pigeons ( 1 ) 
Los Angeles, California (2) 
Garage owner (3) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 

3 (4) 



1, 2, 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROE, 1934 



LEWIS MILESKY 
"Miles" "Lew" 

Rolling pennies down the st. (1) 

Dartmouth (2) 

To be useful and successful (3) 

Ticket Com. "In the Next Room ', 
3; Usher "Haunted House", 1; 
Soph. Social Com., 1, Usher 
"Rear Car", 2; Chairman Tick- 
et Com. Junior Prom., 2; Dram. 
Club, 1, 2, 3; "In the Next 
Room", 3; Exec. Com. Dram. 
Club, 3; Chmn. Ticket Com. 
Sr. Play, 3 ; Exec. Com. German 
Club, 3 ; Senior Dance, 3 ; 
Class Day Com., 3; (4) 

THOMAS MULREAN 

"Willie" "Muggsy" 
Sleeping in Class ( 1 ) 
First National Stores, Inc. (2) 
To read a Joke in the "Mirror" 

written by Kruse (hat's funny 

(3) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 
3 (4) 



STANLEY A. NEDYA 

"Stush" 
All sports and Gardening (l) 
Amherst Agr. Col. (Maybe) (2) 
Wholesale Florist (3) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 

2; Hockey, 1 (4) 



EDMUND F. NOKE 

"Buster" 
Reading ( 1 ) 

U. S. Naval Academy (2) 
To become an Ensign (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Baseball, 3 ; 

Basketball, 2, 3; Nazi Club, 

3 (4) 



LILLIAN NYSTROM 

"Lil" 
Walking (1) 
Head-Dietician in the New W. 

H. S. Cafeteria (2) 
To be a Dietician ( 3 ) 
Baseball, 2, 3; Bowling, 1, 2, 3 

(4) 




EDITH M. MOSS 
"Edie" 

Riding in Gratia's Ford ( 1 ) 

Newton Tra-ning School (2) 

To become a nurse (3) 

Baseball, 1 ; Class Baseball Team, 
1 ; Bowling, 1 ; Class Bowling 
Team, .1; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Class Basketball Team, 1; Or- 
chestra, 2, 3 (4) 



ROBERT MYSHRALL 

"Bob- 
Selling shoes ( 1 ) 
Boston University (2) 
To become a mayor ( 3 ) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Football 1 

(4) 



RICKARD NELLSON 

"Dick", "Hoss", "Jake", 
"Swede" 
Boating, Guns, Saving Horses ( 1 ) 
Heaven (2) 
Go around the world with an 

orchestra playing Hepsibar (3) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 3; 

Football, 1, 3 (4) 



MAE LAVINIA NUTTING 

"Starchy" 
Doing things ( 1 ) 
Sahara Desert (2) 
To find myself (3) 
Commercial Club. 3 ; Member of 

Membership Committee of 

Commercial Club (4) 



RUTH M. OLSON 

"Shrimp" 
Looking for Amy and walking 

(1) 
Out West (2) 
To be a Dietician ( 3) 
Red Cross, 2 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



SANTA PETER ORIFICE 

"Sano" 
Woodcraf tsman ( 1 ) 
Manager in Chain Store ( 1 ) 
To have a store of my own (3) 
Baseball, 1 ; Hockey, 1 ; Magazine, 
2 ; Sportlight, 3 ; Class Year 
Book, Honor Roll, 3; (4) 



AUGUSTINE R. PALUMBO 
"Augie" "Lefty", "Bill". 
"Bud- 
Swimming at the Y.M.C.A. with 

Van Wart ( 1 ) 
Bridgewater Normal School (2) 
Selling Oil Burners in Africa ( o , 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 
3 ; Junior Prom Committee, 2 ; 
Hockey, 3 ; Basketball, 3 ; Sen- 
ior Dance Committee, 3 (4) 

ALBERT F. PERNA 
"Boots" 

Picking Pansies (1) 

Dramatics (2) 

To be as good a comedian as Mr. 
Ward (3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, I, 
2, 3 ; Hockey Mgr., 2 ; Base- 
ball Mgr., 2, 3; Class Pres., 1; 
Jr. Prom. Chmn., 2 ; Sr. Prom. 
Chmn., 3 ; Sr. Play Chmn., 3 ; 
Advertising Mgr. "Mirror", 3; 
Senior Play Cast, 3 ; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2, 3; "Haunted 
House" Cast, 1 ; "Sauce for the 
Gosling" Cast, 1 ; Soph. Hop 
Com., 1 ; Radio Broadcast with 
Dramatic Club (4) 

WALTER E. POPE 

"Smiling Wallie" 
The women ( 1 ) 
North Quincy (2) 
To coach Frenchie Brinn's "kid" 

in Hockey ( 3 ) 
Hockey, 2, 3; Baseball, 3; IV G 

Sport Light, Honor Roll, 2, 3 

(4) 



ANNETTE RHAULT 
"Nanette" 

Movies and Teasing People ( 1 ) 

To sleep 'till 12 every day dur- 
ing summer vacation (3) 

Monitor, 2; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; 
Advertising Com. of Senior 
Play (4) 




FREDERICK PAGE 

"Fred", "Freddy", "Twinie", 

"Prod", "Honky" 
Eating ( 1 ) 

Mass. State College (2) 
To be a Florist, raising pansies 

(3) 
Football, 1; Golf, 2, 3; Track, 3 

(4) 



DELIA PAZZANA 

"Dee" 
Dancing (1) 
Tranining School (2) 
Superintendent Nurse 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; 

3; Track Meet 



< 3 > 
Bowling, 1, 2, 

Winner, 2 (4) 



MARY PIERCE 
"Mary", "Jo" 
Collecting old coins 
Framingham Normal 
To Travel ( 3 ) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
1, 2, 3 (4) 



(1) 
School 



(2) 



Honor Roll, 



GEORGE RENNA 

"Didgie" 
Golf (1) 

Bemis Naval Academy (2) 
To marry Greta Garbo ( 3 ) 
Baseball, 1 ; Hockey 1 ; Honor 

Roll, 1, 2; Basketball, 2, 3; 

Commercial Club 3 (4) 



RHODES 



ROBERT E. 

"Bob" 
Amateur radio ( 1 ) 
West (2) 
None as yet (3) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



ALAN RINGROSE 

"Red" "Driz" 
Midnite Rambles, Poker Parties 

Wine, Women, War (1) 
Somewhere where it is always 

warm (2) 
Enough to live without working 

(3) 

Track, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Football, 2 ; Senior Play Com- 
mittee, 3 (4) 



FRED ROBICHAUD 

"Robie" 
Golf (1) 
Stanford (2) 
Business man (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 



LOUISE B. RUTTER 

"Weesie" 

Swimming ( 1 ) 

Wisconsin (2) 

Time will tell ! (3) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 2 ; Tennis, 3 ; Social Com., 
1 ; Monitor, 2 ; Dramatic Club 
Social Comm., 3 (4) 



ELEANOR SHORT 

"Shorty" 
Collecting souvenirs (1) 
Nursing (2) 
To Travel (3) 
Basketball, 3; Baseball, 3 



(4) 



CARLTON SMITH 
"Pete"- — various others 

Nuthin-or (1) 

Bowdoin if O. K.'d by teachers 
(3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 
(4) 




HARVEY ROBERTS 

"Bob- 
Movies ( 1 ) 
Northeastern (2) 
To be a big banker (3) 
"Sprouts" (4) 



JOSEPH ROWE 

"Joe" "Handspring' 
Playing my banjo (1) 
Jake's Palace (2) 
To be an optician (3) 
None to speak of (4) 



ARTHUR SCHAUFUS 



BLANCHE SIMON 
"Chink" "Major" 

Julie (1) 

On Island made of gum (2) 

Julie (3) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 2, 
3; Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Base- 
ball, 1, 2; Field Hockev, 1, 2 
(4) 



PR1SCILLA SMITH 

"Smitty" 
Bridge (1) 

New York (eventually) (2) 
To be an Olympic Swimmer (3) 
Hockey, Class and Varsity, 1, 2, 
3; Ast. Hockey Mgr., 3; Bas- 
ketball, Class and Varsity, 1, 2 
3; Ast. Basketball Mgr., 2 
Manager, 3; Bowling, 1, 2, 3 
Team, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3 
Team, 1; Dramatic Club, 1, 3 
Chmn. Dramatic Club Dance 
3; Senior Play Com., 3 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



LILLIAN SPENCER 

"Spence" 
Collecting snapshots, Talking ( 1 ) 
Paris, France (2) 
To find out how the IV D girls 

got that way ( 3 ) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Chairman of 

the Entertainment Com., 3 (4) 

ETHEL STORER 

"Flash- 
Sports, Dancing (l) 
You'll see me there sometime (2) 
To develop a personality! (3) 
Class Basketball Team, 1, 2, 3; 
Varsity Basketball Team, 2, 3; 
Class Bowling Team, 2, 3; 
Varsity Bowling Team, 2 ; Class 
Baseball Team 2 ; Class Hock- 
ey, 2, 3; Sr. Dance Com., 3; 
Chief Usher Football Games, 3 ; 
Chmn. of Assembly Com. 
Comm. Club, 3; Comm. Club 
Dance Com., 3; Agent, "Mir- 
ror", 2, 3; Honor Roll, 2 (4) 



RUTH SULLIVAN 

"Ruthie" 
Swimming, Dancing (1) 
Holland? (2) 
To Travel (3) 
Baseball, 2, 3 (4) 



SHYRLIE BETTE TATELMAN 

"Shyrl" 'Stissy' "T" 
Sucking lollypop at 12:45 (1) 
Salem Teachers College (2) 
To be a Commercial Teacher (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2; 
Football Usher, 2(4) 



RAYMOND TENANTY 
"Shorty" "Ray" 

Big league baseball ( 1 ) 

The top of the pile (2) 

To be a second H. V. Kalten- 
born (3) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 3; Hon- 
or Roll, 1, 2, 3; Asst. Editor 
"Mirror", 2; Editor-in-Chief 
"Mirror", 3; Class President, 2, 
3 ; Stage Mgr. Dramatic Club 
Play, 3; Monitor, 1; W.B.S.O. 
broadcasts, 3; "Trysting Place" 
Cast, 3 ; Jr. Prom Comm., 3 ; 
Jr. Social Com., 2 ; Picture 
Com., 3; Sr. Play Com., 3; 
Sr. Prom Com., 3 (4) 




EDITH STEARNS 

"Deedee" 
Music (1) 
Music (2) 
Music (3) 
Orchestra, 2, 3; Dramatic Club. 

2, 3; Assembly Pianist, 3; 

Music Editor of "Mirror", 3; 
Patroness Com. of Senior Play, 3 

(4) 



HAROLD STRUM 

"Tuba" "Strum" 
Music (1) 

New England Conservatory (2) 
To play in a big orchestra (3) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 

(4) 



VINCENT SUMNER 

"Vinny" 
Yodeling ( 1) 

Well— (2) 
To be on radio ( 3 ) 
Trade Basketball, Football, 1, 

3; Track (4) 



RUTH TAYLOR 
Collecting pictures of people ( 1 ) 
Europe (2) 

To be a nurse abroad (3) 
Baseball, 2; Basketball, 2; Red 
Cross, 2 (4) 



ALBERT THOMAS 

"Al" 
Tennis ( 1 ) 
M. N. S. (2) 
To guzzle all the Frappes I want 

(3) 

Track, 1, 2; Jr. Prom Comm., 1; 
Honor Roll, 1 (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 19 34 



PHYLLIS E. THOMPSON 

"Betty" 
Sports ( 1 ) 
Business School (2) 
To see Paris first (3) 



MYRA TOWERS 
"Mitzy" "Red" 
Eating Ice Cream ( 1 ) 
New England Deaconess (2) 
Nurse (3) 
Tennis, 3; Basketball, 2 (4) 



CHARLES TRUE 
"Kreuger" 

Radio (1) 

Bentleys? (2) 

Accountant (3) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Senior Dance 
Comm., Senior Play Comm., 
Commercial Club, 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 2, 3; Cartoon Club, 3 (4) 



THELMA TUFTS 

"Pidgin" 
Helen and Ruth ( 1 ) 
Room 2 3 Haverford College (2) 
To shake hands with Hitler! (3) 
Soph. Social Comm., 1 ; Class 
Secretary (Soph.), 1; Basket- 
ball, Seniors, 3; Honor Roll, 
2, 3 (4) 



INEZ DOROTHY UHLIN 

"Inie" 
Drawing, Poetry Writing (1) 
Sweden (2) 
Private Secretary to the President 

(3) 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 




DAVID TINKER 
"Tink" "Dave" 

Studying (1) 

California (2) 

To see Dick Ncllson on the Hon- 
or Roll (3) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 3; Base- 
ball, 2; Band, 1, 2", 3 (4) 



JOSEPH S. TROMBLEY 

"Joe" 
Saving people's lives ( 1 ) 
Northeastern University (2) 
To be a lawyer ( 3 ) 
Varsity Football, 1; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3; Baseball, 1 (4) 



EDITH TRUESDELL 

"Edie" 
Collecting Stamps ( 1 ) 
Camden, N. J. (2) 
Nurse in West Jersey 

pathic Hospital (3) 



Homeo- 



EUGENIA TYLER 

"Genie" 
Music, Reading (1) 
Simmons (2) 
To go to Europe (3) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Honor 

L 2, 3 (4) 



Roll, 



ROY VAN WART, JR 

"Fat" "Tubby" "Van" 

"Dutch" 
Most anything ( 1 ) 
It may be too hot there (2) 
Be public enemy No. 1 (3) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Senior 
Play Comm., 3; Golf, 2, (4) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 19 34 



JOHN VISCOGLIOSI 

"Visk" 
Model Building, Dancing (1) 
Where men are small and the 

women don't care (2) 
To raise a family (3) 
Senior Dance Comm., 3 ; Honor 

Roll, 2 ; Senior Play Comm., 3 ; 

Basketball, 3 (4) 



JUDITH WATERHOUSE 

"Judy" 

Enjoying life (1) 

William and Mary College (2) 

To sell real estate and to see 
London in a fog (3) 

"Mirror" Staff, 3; Junior Prom 
Comm., 2 ; Senior Dance 
Comm., 3; Hockey, 2, 3; Bowl- 
ing, Varsity, 2, 3 ; Baseball, 2 ; 
Tennis, 3 ; Ticket Comm., Sr. 
Play, 3 (4) 



CLINTON WELLINGTON 

"Duke" 
Pitching horseshoes ( 1 ) 
Out West looking for them (2) 
Finding them (3) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



RUTH WHITTEMORE 

"Ruthie" 
Tennis, Basketball (1) 
Johns Hopkins (2) 
Doctor (3) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 ;Orchestra, 

Book Editor for "Mirror", 2, 

(4) 



ESTHER WILSON 

"Oof- 
Roller-skating ( 1 ) 
Wilfred Academy (2) 
Hairdressing (3) 
Dramatic Club, 3 ; Monitor, 2 



(4) 




GEORGE B. WARNER 
"Bernie" 

Music ( 1 ) 

Nowhere in particular (2) 

To be able to play the flute like 
Willie Mulrean (3) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



ALBERT EDWARD WEINER 
"Al" 

Trying to discover something — 1 
mustn't work (1) 

Harvard ( 2 ) 

To nourish a brood "a" (3) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3 
Soph. Nominating Comm., 1 
Monitor, 2 ; Dramatic Club, 2 
3 ; Dramatic Club Play Cast, 2 
Treasurer Dramatic Club, 3 
Track Team, 3 ; Social Comm. 
2; "No Greater Glory", W. B 
S. O., 3 (4) 

LOUISE WHITTEMORE 
"Lefty" 

Tennis, Bicycling, Badminton ( 1 ) 

Art School (2) 

To breed throughbred dogs and 
horses ( 3 ) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Varsity, 2, 3; 
Tennis Varsity 2 ; Manager, 3 ; 
Tournament, 2 ; Bowling, 1, 2, 
3; Varsity, 2; Baseball, 1, 2; 
Class Day Comm., 3 ; Patron- 
ess Comm., (Senior Play), 3; 
Volleyball, 3 (4) 



JACK T. WILBER 

"Jake" 
Sports in general (1) 
M. I. T. (2) 

Chemical Engineer (3) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



AMY WOODSIDE 
Looking for Ruthie, riding, walk- 
ing (1) 
South America (2) 
To be a hairdresser (3) 



Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIRROR, 1934 






GUIDO YAMARTINO 

"Squeek" "Cyrano" "Schnozzel" 
Reading (l) 
M. I. T. (2) 
Mechanical Engineering (3) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2 (4) 



HELEN CAMPBELL 

Thelma and Ruth (1) 

The Orient (2) 

Travel (3) 

Sophomore Social Committee, 1 ; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Senior 

Play, 3 (4) 



DANA E. HEATH 

"Little Man" 
Tennis, Radio (1) 
Europe (2) 
To be a millionaire (3) 











JOHN RICHARD ZENO 

"Crooner" 
Throwing home run balls ( 1 ) 
Slippery Rock University (2) 
To be a Fairy Soap salesman (3) 
Varsity Football, 1, 2; Varsity 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Varsity Base- 
ball Captain, 3 (4) 



LINDA DOROTHY CARDILLO 
"Dot" "Lindy" 

Sports ( 1 ) 

Your guess is as good as mine 
(2) 

Physical Instructor, swim across 
Niagara, Be a priest (3) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 2, 
3 ; Tennis, 3 ; Captain Hockey, 
Basketball, Baseball, 1 ; Capt. 
Class and Varsity Basketball; 
Baseball, 2 ; Capt. Varsity Bas- 
ketball, 3 ; Volleyball, 3 ; Chmn. 
Jr. Social, 2 ; Drum Major 
Ass't., 1, 2; Drum Major Lead- 
er, 3 ; Com. Member Jr. Prom, 
2 ; Sr. Dance Com., 3 ; Member 
Comm. Club, 3 ; Chmn. Comm. 
Club Dance, 3; Newton Field 
Day Gym Meet, 1, 2; Ticket 
Tom. Sr. Play, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3; 
Member of Nom. Com. for 
Rep. of A. A. ; Chicago with 
School Band; Baseball, 3; Sr. 
Play Com., 3 (4) 



%f t tt^x^h 7<f-*- 



' PVl &-/?/ <?C#mj UrAS 




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Note: (1) Hobby. (2) Destination. (3) Ambition. (4) Activities. 



THE MIR ROE, 1934 



ROBERT E. P. AHLMAN 

"Swede" "Bob" "Repa" 
Bumming Butts (1) 
Anyplace where the cat goes (2) 
To go to Regis College (3) 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 
2, 3; Golf, 2; Tennis, 2 (4) 

ELIOT B. ANDERSON 

"Andy" "Swede" 
Kidding Manuel (1) 
Some Print Shop (2) 
To beat Floyd Gibbons ( 3 ) 
Tr. Basketball, 2, 3; Tr. Baseball, 

2; Tr. Football, 2, 3 (4) 

WILLIAM J. ARCHDEACON 
"Lightning" "Archy" 

Getting into trouble — Golf — Avi- 
ation (1) 

Aviation School (2) 

To become a millionaire (3) 

ANTONIO BOCCABELLO 

"Bucky" 
Playing Baseball ( 1 ) 
University of So. Cal. (2) 
Become a professional baseball 

player (3) 
Commercial Club, 3; Baseball, 1, 
2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2; Track, 1 (4) 

HAROLD BORR 

"Max" 
Hunting (l) 
Boston University (2) 
Run an automobile agency (3) 
Football, 1, 2, 3 (4) 

VINCENT J. BRYSON 

"V" "Vinnie" 

Hitting the high spots, Sports, 
Travel (1) 

Citadel, North Carolina (2) 

To become a journalist of note 
(3) 

Basketball ; Senior Play Commit- 
tee; Football; Hockey; Trojans 
(4) 

JAMES BURBECK 

"Jimmie" 
Basketball (l) 
To be on my way (2) 
To be a printer (3) 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3 (4) 

CHARLES F. CHRISTIE, JR. 

"Charlie" 
Reading (1) 
Scientific College (2) 
To become a biological chemist 

(3) 
Dramatic Club Annual Play, 3 ; 

Senior Class Annual Play (4) 

ROBERT COLEMAN 

"Legs" 
Sleeping (l) 
Some school (2) 
To get a full house (3) 



JOHN W. CREASE 

"Tiger" 
Mechanic (1) 
None (2) 

The Sultan's Harem (3) 
None but a life of leisure (4) 

THOMAS CURTIN 

"Tommy" 
Sports ( 1 ) 

Sitting on Top of the world (2) 
To be Mayor of Roberts (3) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Senior Play 

Committee (4) 

FRANCES MARY D'ORAZIO 

"Frannie" 
Reading Van Dyne's Stories ( 1 ) 
School of Costume Design (2) 
Costume Designing (3) 

ROBERT EISNER 

"Eyes" 
Swimming ( 1 ) 
Europe (2) 
To get a job (3) 

GUSTAVE ERBE 

"Gus" 
Loafing (1) 
Six feet under (2) 
To beat Red Dinsmore in a game 

of pool (3) 

ANNA MARY FRITH 

"Sliver" 
Sewing (1) 
Seamstress (2) 
Go to Clothing School (3) 

ANTHONY GIARDIRA 

"Tony" 
Reading books ( 1 ) 
To work for myself (2) 
To be in big business (3) 
Commercial Club, 3 (4) 

THOMAS GIROLAMO 

"Jerry" "Chile" 
Pool (1) 
West Coast (2) 
Pool-shark (3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
. 3; IV G Sportlight, 3 (4) 

ROBERT HAMILL 

"Bob" 
Swimming, Flying ( 1 ) 
Around the world (2) 
To be a pilot (3) 

BARBARA ANN HENRY 
"Pat" 

Studying people and sports (l) 

White House (2) 

Be an Angel (3) 

Orchestra, 1, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; 
Hockey, 1, 3; Tennis, 2, 3; 
Bowling, 1, 2; Poetry for "Mir- 
ror" 1, 2, 3 (4) 



LUCY HOLTON 

"Oui" 
Eating and Sleeping ( 1 ) 
Paris (2) 

Costume Designer (3) 
Bowling, 1, 2; Football Usher, 1, 

2; Baseball, 1; Tennis, 1 (4) 

TULLIO IODICE 

"Toot" 
Sports, Stamp Collecting (1) 
Quien Sabe (2) 
I am no Caesar (3) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 

1, 2 (4) 

ARTHUR E. JOHNSON 

"Sousa" 
Music (1) 
Roberts (2) 

To be a song writer (3) 
Junior Band, 1, 2, 3; Senior 

Band, 1, 2 ; (Chicago) (4) 

VIOLA JOHNSON 

"Square Head" "Vi" 
Canoeing ( 1 ) 

Mass. General Hospital (2) 
Nurse (3) 
Basketball, 3; Baseball, 3 (4) 

MARY JULIANO 

"Mudd" "Tiny" 
Chewing Gum, Dancing, Smiling 

(1) 
Normal School (2) 
Be a teacher (3) 

FRED KATWICK 

"Fred" 
Fishing, Dancing (1) 
Unknown ( 2 ) 
Just to be "smilin' " (3) 
Dramatic Club (4) 

EDWARD KELLY 

"Fat" 
Hockey (1) 
Job (2) 
Africa (3) 
Football, 1, 2, 3 (4) 

WILLIAM J. KRONGARD 

"Max" 
Eight syllable words ( 1 ) 
University of Alabama (2) 
Journalism (3) 
Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 

3 ; Senior Play Committee, 3 ; 

Senior Dance Committee, 3 (4) 

CLARENCE LA MONT 
"K. O." 

Tennis (1) 

Lexington (2) 

Tildens Ball Chaser (3) 

Tennis, 3 ; Commercial Club, 3 ; 
Membership Committee Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (4) 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



ROBERT LAWSON 

"Caesar" 
Arguing with Ringrose and Ten- 

anty, International Diplomacy 

(1) 

University of Heidelberg, Baden- 
Baden, Germany; and points 
East (1) 

To be a dictator, and to see 
Ringrose married at the age of 
19 (3) 



GRACE LEONARD 

"Grade" 
Walking (1) 
School (2) 

Interior Decoratoress (3) 
Baseball, 3 (4) 



JOHN LOWD 

"Lowdie" 
Saturday night dances ( 1 ) 
One Million Miles from Bicycle 

Park (2) 
Learn the Carioca ( 3 ) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Football, 1 (4) 



EDWIN MacDONALD 

"Mac" 
Taking things apart ( 1 ) 
Who knows (2) 
To see the World's Fair (3) 
Member of Commercial Club, 3 

(4) 



HAROLD MADDEN 
"Firefly" 

Baseball (1) 

Arlington (2) 

To be a printer (3) 

Trade Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
bell, 1, 2, 3 (4) 



helen McCarthy 

"Red" 
Hiking (1) 
New York (2) 
Go to Business School ( 3 ) 
Baseball, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; 

Bowling, 2, 3 (4) 



ELEANOR M. MIELE 
"El" 

Chewing Gum (1) 

West (2) 

To be a cowgirl (3) 

Candy Girl in Senior Play, 3 ; 
Honor Roll, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 
2, 3; Basketball, 3 (4) 



FRANCIS MOGAN 

"Dogan" 
Riding (1) 
New Orleans (2) 
Auto Mechanic ( 3) 
Parking (4) 



MADELINE MOGAN 
"Maddy" 

Swimming (1) 

Wilfred Academy (2) 

Beauty Specialist (3) 

Baseball, 1; Basketball, 1; Vol- 
ley-ball, 1; Field Hockey, I (4) 



JOSEPH MUISE 

Scouts, Music ( 1 ) 

We'll not say yet (2) 

To become a Scout Executive (3) 



GEORGE POIRIER 
"Perry" 

Reading and Hiking ( 1 ) 
Unknown (2) 
To Travel (3) 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Basketball, 
3 (4) 



JOHN RANDO 
"Rutgers" 

Models (1) 

Northeastern (2) 

To be a successful business man 
(3) 

Commercial Club, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1; Hon- 
or Roll, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1 (4) 



FRANCIS A. RECKA 

"Bud" 
Doing nothing ( 1) 
M. I. T. (2) 
Get along without working (3) 



ROBERT STEPHEN RHODES 

"Bob" "Dusty" 
Hockey ( 1 ) 
Boston Bruins (2) 
Boston Bruins (3) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; 

Track, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 3 

(4) 



HELEN ROSS 

Reading, Drawing ( 1 ) 

Maybe Art School (2) 

To be a commercial artist (3) 



JAMES A. RYAN 
"Jimmie" 

To see my bunny ( 1 ) 

Weston Street (2) 

C. P. A. (3) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 
3 ; Nazi Club, 3 ; Commercial 
Club, 3; Junior Prom Com., 2; 
Senior Play Com., 3; Senior 
Dance Com., 3 ; Class Will As- 
sistant, 3 (4) 



THOIvfAS SABETTI 
"Rosebud" 

Beautiful girls ( 1 ) 

New York (2) 

A successful business man (3) 

Entertainment Committee of Com- 
mercial Club (4) 



LOIS SMITH 

"Smitty" "Ding" 
Riding, Music ( 1) 
Heaven knows? (2) 
Find Joe Penner's Lost Captain 

Commercial Club, 3 (4) 



WINIFRED E. STEBNER 

"Winnie" "Blondy" 
Drawing (1) 
Where ever I end ( 2 ) 
Secret Service Detective ( 3 ) 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Commercial 

Club, 3 (4) 



ARTHUR MELANSON 
Heartbreaker, Checkers, Art, 

Women, Basketball 
220 degrees above zero (1) 
To be a Gigilo (2) 
To eat, sleep, play (3) 



ROBERT HAMBLEN WRIGHT 

"Bob" "Robin" 
Collecting Souvenirs (1) 
Des Moines, Iowa (2) 
To become a Doctor (3) 



THE MIREOK, 1934 



Class History 



Beneath a spreading shingled roof 

This class of ours has been 
From Sophomores (most verdant youth) 

To Seniors, safe kept in, 
But now protection ceases; so 

We'll take it on the chin. 

As Sophs we chose as president, 
The Boots we all have known, 

While Harrigan as substitute 
Kept on without a groan; 

With Auditor Cataldo there 
Our hopeful seeds were sown. 

And Secretary Tufts, we know, 

Did all there was to do, 
While Baumann boldly had to go 

As Treasurer, to glue 
His name before his comrades' eyes 

As advertisers do. 

Our class (divided as it was) 

Began a year of strife, 
Escaping from the Juniors' claws 

And from the Seniors' knife; 
But now we're Seniors! What a change 

In three short years of life! 

As man to man, I can't recall 

Just when the Social was, 
But if I say 'twas in the hall, 

I guess that fills the clause; 
And some they say enjoyed the thing 

While others proffer "Haws". 

Well, anyhow, the football team 

Was not what it should be, 
But then our boys were young and green, 

While now they're fat and free, 
And men (almost) so worldly wise, 

(The wisdom's hard to see!) 

'Twas then we first began to see 
"Commercial Club" on signs. 

I understand they had a spree 
At Boone beneath the pines 

(At least, I hope such trees grow there, 
It's easy on the lines.) 

They also had a dance, it seems, 

Upon November ten; 
Attendance passed their fondest dreams, 

A real success, and then 
Some more; the local social light 

Shone bright November ten. 



So then to Junior-dom we rose 

Triumphant, bold as Jays, 
But why above us, goodness knows, 

Are Seniors and their ways? 
Ambition upward soared until — 

We'd been there several days! 

Our staff was chosen wisely yet, 

With Ray and Harrigan, 
Whom none can ever quite forget 

As chief and second man; 
Dot Furbush was our private sec. 

And Bob, adjusting man. 

Next autumn brought a lot of things, 

And football, one of these. 
'Twas then the boys first felt the stings 

That came from many D's 
Because it kept them off the squad 

(Some folks are hard to please.) 

This year the team improved a bit 
O'er last year's rate and score, 

But many of our class did sit 
Until they were quite sore 

Upon the bench, while Seniors had 
Their chance to make us roar. 

A social was our brightest thought 

So Linda was elected 
To serve as chairman on the spot, 

But somehow unexpected, 
The thing did not take hold, and so 

The social was rejected. 

The hockey stars went forth to play, 

And also just to skate; 
They won no games (the records say) 

They lost exactly eight. 
But anyhow, they hoped to be 

Good at a later date. 

The Club Commercial held a jig 

November ten again, 
But this one did not go so big 

(A dearth of girls and men) 
So change the subject. Let us see 

What Dramatists did then. 

They were, as always, popular 

And full of good intent; 
We had a member Burke in there 

As second president. 
I might just add the plays were good 

So everybody went. 



THE MIEBOE, 1934 



CLASS HISTORY, Cont. 



The next affair we took in hand 

Was for the Red Cross call ; 
The Seniors were, you understand, 

The leaders of it all, 
But we stepped in and did our part 

Lest they alone might fall. 

We canvassed here and canvassed there, 
Front, side, and kitchen door, 

Collecting dollars everywhere, 
In mansion, shack, or store 

From those who wished to do some good 
For those who needed more. 

The hockey team for girls was out 
Each day they weren't too lame 

From taking blows (without a doubt.) 
It really is a shame, 

That after using all that pep 
They tied each battled game. 

And now we come to something fine, 
Our grand farewell to those 

Who brightly in their day did shine, 
Whose schooldays soon would close 

And who would spend their coming years 
In work or sweet repose. 



We all trooped back to Waltham High 
Some time just last September; 

What was the date? I can't reply 
I really can't remember, 

But let it pass. We were, I know, 
Quite happy, every member. 

The football team indeed was good, 

Our Senior boys did play, 
And won as Waltham really should 

Six times in ten, and they 
Then tied just three and lost but one 

To Newton, by the way. 

The president is Ray just now 
With Fahey in second chair. 

While Dot and Bob repeat their bow 
Because they're both still there 

As secretary 'n' auditor, 
Their heavy work to share. 

Dramatic Club put on a play 

Rehearsing all the fall ; 
The play was fine, 'tis truth to say. 

While at South Junior Hall 
That night, we came to recognize 

Some actors at our call. 



The classic was the Prom (you're right!) 

And Perna was the head 
Of everything that lively night. 

And, friends, I've heard it said 
That when the cash was counted out 

The class was "out of red." 

Now comes the band, the band we know 

As great in local eyes, 
Out west to Evanston did go 

To take the cake and prize 
Away from every other school 

About an equal size. 

They won first prize for drilling and 

A second for their notes, 
We think they all deserve a hand 

For toiling in those coats 
Beneath the hot Chicago sun 

To get their rivals' goats. 

That's all that happened Junior year 

I'm very sad to say, 
And were we glad to really hear 

The teacher firmly say, 
"Till next September, from my sight 

Dear pupils, kindly stay!" 



At Nutting's Perna held the Dance 
For Seniors in their prime; 

It was December, thus a chance 
To make a warmer clime 

Within the windy walls to tune 
Of syncopated rime. 

The Seniors then got on the lam 
To get themselves a place 

In "Mrs. Temple's Telegram." 
It was a lively race 

And he who won, on posters saw 
A likeness of his face. 

The play went over simply "swell" 
With Chairman Boots again, 

But stick around and let me tell 
About our hockey men, 

Who played the semi-final game 
And lost to Walpole then. 

And now a little different thought 
For I don't wish to bore; 

The city has so kindly bought 
For us a new gym floor 

So we can do our stuff as it 
Was never done before. 



THE MIKROE, 19 34 



CLASS HISTORY, Cont. 



A social seems to be the rage, 
Commercial Club had two ; 
Dramatic Club, so saith a sage, 

They never should outdo; 
And so this latter group went out 

And held two socials, too! 

The girls have played a hockey and 

At basketball I hear. 
Miss Sewall has the records scanned 

To check those points so dear, 
So numerals and letters go 

For taking part this year. 



This year the Mirror came out twice 
With Raymond as the chief, 

And they found out who paid the price 
(But surely not in grief!) 

That these editions were just "swell," 
Which was to our relief. 

As all good things must come to close 

So must this recitation. 
I've done my best to quite disclose 

Each Senior occupation, 
And if you want to find some fault — 

I'm off on my vacation! 

Richard Lyon. 



Who's Who in the Class of 1934 



Most Popular Boy 

Most Popular Girl 

Best Looking Boy 

Best Looking Girl 

Most Studious Boy 

Most Studious Girl 

Best Actor 

Best Actress 

Most Cheerful Boy 

Most Cheerful Girl 

Best Dressed Boy 

Best Dressed Girl 

Class Bad Man 

Class Baby 

Most Athletic Boy 

Most Athletic Girl 

Brightest Social Light 

Class Clown 

Boy Most Likely to Succeed 

Girl Most Likely to Succeed 



Raymond Tenanty 

Dorothy Furbush 

Raymond Tenanty 

Ruth Johnson 

George Dolber 

Margaret Harris 

Albert Perna 

Carolyn Brehm 

Harold Burke 

Judith Waterhouse 

Derwood Frost 

Judith Waterhouse 

Alphonse Collura 

Harold Davis 

Lawrence Hafrigan 

Dorothy Furbush 

Carolyn Brehm 

William Archdeacon 

George Dolber 

Margaret Harris 



THE MIREOK, 1934 




SENIOR PLAY CAST 

Front Row: Helen Campbell, Carolyn Brehm, Frances G. Mahoney, Dorothy Furbush. 
Back Row: Harold Burke, Gardner Burt, Leon Fernald, Albert Perna, Charles Christie. 



THE MIKKOK, 1934 



Class Prophecy 



It was in June, 1956, that my friend, Frederic 
Joslyn, Chairman of the Watch and Ward Society, 
and I went to the Gardner L. Burt Burlesque, to 
see the preview of Harold Boor's latest picture, 
"Why Girls Leave Home" — in seven parts — and 
starring his wife, the former Carolyn Brehm. 

We stood for some time outside the Theatre, 
gazing at the posters of "Fanny G, the Fan 
Dancer", painted by that eminent artist, Marcelle 
Iodice, before we came to the realization that 
"Fanny G." was none other than Frances G. Ma- 
honey. Hastily we purchased tickets from Jean 
Lemon at the box-office, and after handing them 
to the two doormen, Locke and Keyes, we rushed 
into the imposing interior of the Burt Burlesque. 
As we entered, Harlem Fleming's Philharmonic 
Orchestra began to play "SHE USED TO BE A 
SCHOOL TEACHER, BUT SHE HAS NO 
CLASS NOW", This composition was by two of 
my former class-mates, Long and Short. 

From our programmes we learned that "Fofo" 
Collura was playing the harp ; Thomas Gallagher, 
the 'cello; Robert Ahlman, the piccolo; Clifford 
Curtis, the flute; Lawrence Harrigan, the lyre; 
Walter Pope, the piano; Babe Fahey, the xylo- 
phone; Roy Van Wart, the violin; and Stephen 
Hodge, the drums. With a deafening crash the 
selection came to an end, the lights dimmed, and 
the Kaswell Newsreel — Seize all, Nose all — was 
flashed upon the screen. 

The first episode shown by the Newsreel was an 
interview with the famous mathematician and 
physicist, Joseph Keane, who with the help of his 
colleagues had proved the Einstein Theory to be 
false. As his collaborators, Thomas Curtin, Clin- 
ton Eldridge, Edward Burns, and Alan Ringrose, 
nodded and stroked their long white beards, 
Joseph endeavored to explain the new principle 
he had discovered, but our attention was distracted 
from the screen by the entrance of Richard Nell- 
son, the beer baron. Surrounded by his body- 
guards, John Viscogliosi, Guido Yamartino, Joseph 
Rowe and Robert Larson, he strode down the 
aisle, the cynosure of all eyes, and after glancing 



serreptitiously around — his hand on his gun — he 
slunk into his seat. 

When I next looked at the screen, there was 
being shown the pictures of the two leading con- 
testants in the race for the Dana Heath Cup, and 
the title of "THE YOUNGEST GRANDFATH- 
ER IN SEVEN COUNTIES." They were George 
Ellis and his wife, the former Dorothy Furbush, 
and Raymond Tennanty and his wife, the former 
Charlotte Littlefield. In a brief speech, Dorothy 
said that she felt that she owed everything to 
Clark's Contented Cows' Milk; while Charlotte 
said that she attributed her success to Olsen's 
Ozonated Orange Juice. 

The Kaswell Newsreel next took us to the wilds 
of Lakeview, where those intrepid explorers, John 
Carruthers, Robert Champion, Domenic Cusano, 
Harvey Roberts, and George Warner were setting 
out to chart the unexplored country. They had 
docked at the Cambridge Water Basin on the 
steamer Cruiser Kruse, captained by George Renna. 
The explorers were fortunate in being able to se- 
cure two native guides, Annette Rhault and Flor- 
ence LaChapelle to assist them. As the scene 
closed, our adventurers were choosing a suitable 
location for their camp, Britt Haven, named in 
honor of the financier of the trip, Mary Britt. 

Next, in an exclusive interview, Victor Joos, 
who was defending his title of "PAPERWEIGHT 
CHAMPION" against Russell Ferro, stated the 
reasons why he felt confident of winning again. 
His press agent, Gerald Beauman denied his re- 
ported engagement to Marion Lyden, saying that 
Victor had never heard of the woman. 

The next news item transferred us to South- 
ampton, where that new, monstrous liner, S. S. 
Cataldo, was about to make her maiden voyage. 
This new liner was captained by my old friend 
Peter Bogert. On the deck, surrounded by a group 
of photographers, among whom we recognized 
Christopher Beattie, James Brown, and Charles 
Christie, stood Priscilla Smith, who had just come 
into an estate of five million left to her by her 
dear, departed husband, William Archdeacon. It 



THE MIEEOE, 1934 



is now reported that Priscilla has broken all records 
by becoming engaged to the three of the Midivani 
brothers at the same time. 

The hog-calling contest in Arkansas was where 
we were next taken. The competitors, William 
Krongard, Robert Rhodes, Robert Wright, John 
Zeno, Harold Strum, Thomas Sabetti, and Arthur 
Schaufus were lined up with their wives, Judith 
Waterhouse, Louise Wittemore, Esther Wilson, 
Ruth Whittemore, Inez Uhlin, Eugenia Tyler, and 
Edith Truesdell, ready to begin. 

The judges of the contest, Viola Johnson, Mary 
Juliano, and Margaret Kann promised to give an 
unbiased decision, and then the contest began. The 
newsreel mercifully spared us the agony of being 
forced to listen, but after the contest, the winner, 
Harold Strum, was presented with a set of teacups, 
made by the Taylor-Tower China Factory. 

Next there was flashed upon the screen an ex- 
clusive interview with the two lawyers, Ina Adcock 
and Helen Ballantine, opposing each other in the 
notorious Corson-LoPresti murder case. In a con- 
cise speech, each stated her reasons for believing 
her client innocent, but woman-like, the interview 
ended in a fight, with Adcock going down under 
the hay-makers delivered by Ballantine. 

The last episode shown by the Kaswell News- 
reel, was an appeal by James Ryan for more funds 
to enable the Hurd Home for Hermits to carry 
on their good work. As Ryan was telling the 
pathetic plight of some of the inmates, several 
were moved to tears, and Dana Johnson, overcome 
with grief, was carried from the theatre in a swoon 
by the ushers Robert Coleman, Harold Davis, and 
Clyde Harvey. 

With a fan-fare of trumpets the Newsreel was 
ended ; the stage lights went on ; and the curtain 
rose on the first act — Anderson's Acrobats. It was 
rather a shock to Frederic and me, to see some of 
our former class-mates hurling through the air; 
for there was Mary Lee Bettinger, hanging by her 
toes . . . there, Thelma Carville hanging from a 
rope by her nose. . . .then, in a breath-taking dive, 
Barbara Henry flashed across the stage, catching 
hold of Edith Stearms' feet (Edith holding onto 
Thelma's) . Far, far above the audience, was 
Bertha Majulin, wheeling Anna Mead across a 



tight-rope in a wheel-barrow, while Anna bal- 
anced a plate on her nose. The climax of the act 
came when Derwood Frost while holding onto a 
wire by his teeth, sang a song "JUST A GIG- 
OLO". This act brought down the house, and 
nearly Derwood with it. ^ 

The next act was entitled "KATWICK'S KIT- 
TENS" and featured the dancing team of Helen 
Hibbard and Gustave Erbe. As Gustave came on 
the stage, Frederic began to perspire, as though 
under great mental strain, and when they began to 
dance, he jumped up from his seat and shouted in 
his stentorian vioce, 

"Stop! As Chairman of the Watch and Wardy 
Society, I forbid this act to continue ; It is one of'- V 
my duties to permit no minor to dance upon the 
stage, and Gustave Erbe, is obviously under age?- 
One look at his weak, undernourished body, at his 
thin pallid face, would convince the most sceptical 
that he is far too young to dance." 

As Frederic was talking, Gustave's manager, 
John Maclvor, stepped forth from the wings, 
holding Mr. Erbe's birth-certificate in his hand. 
This he handed to Frederic with the explanation 
that this type of thing happens so often, that he 
was always prepared. Fred, after looking the 
certificate over, apologized, and after he had seated 
himself again — was his face red — the show went 
on. 

While Helen and Gustave danced, the Eaton 
Boys — William Eaton, Charles True, Frances 
Recka, and Fred Page — sang "She Hangs Out In 
Our Alley, But Oh, What She Hangs Out" by 
Smith & Smith (Lois and Carlton). As an added 
attraction, Fred Katwick, the manager of the 
troupe, had secured 4 residents of Samoa, Elizabeth 
Cushman and Leon Fernald, Fred Robichaud and 
Donald Husted to give an exhibition of Samoan 
dancing. That the audience enjoyed the dance 
was manifested by their cries of "Some more, 
Samoa", The act was concluded with this num- 
ber. 

The next act was the fan dancers. A ripple of 
expectation ran through the audience, and when 
the curtain rose to the strains of "THE LADY 
WITH THE FAN", the dancers were greeted 
with a round of applause. As the dancers were 



THE MIEEOR, 19 34 



>** 



«? 



bowing gracefully, Frederic grasped my arm. "Do 
you recognize that platinum blonde, second from 
the left? That's Marion Hayes!" 

"Yes," I agree* after a moment, "and there's 
Thelma Tufts ^ith Helene Betts, Helen Campbell, 
R\ith Sullivan, and Helen Haley." 

Then scanning Our programmes, we discovered 
that not only were these former pupils of Waltham 
High here, but also Therese Chiofaro, Beulah Ed- 
wards, Shirley Andrews, Blanche Simon, and 
Shyrlie Tatelman. 

When we had recovered from the shock of our 
discovery, the dance had ended, and now the Gib- 
,'£son Girls — Helen Ross, Hilda Day, Anna Frith, 
'(and Clara Haslam — models from the Faulkner 
^Gown Shoppe, were parading across the stage., I 
took little notice of this, except for the fact that 
skirts were a half an inch from the floor; the 
hour-glass figure was considered ideal; and birds, 
feathers, fruit, leaves,- beads and braid were dis- 
tributed copiously over the crowns of the enormous 
hats. 

A violin selection by Maestro Richard Lyon was 
the next feature of the act. The young Maestro, 
I later learned, had taken up this instrument only 
after he had been so successful in fiddling away 
his time in High School. His selection was en- 
titled "SHE BROKE MY HEART, SO I BROKE 
HER JAW" by Brown and Greene. However, 
when a string snapped while Richard was playing 
he flew into a rage. Throwing his violin on the 
stage, he jumped up and down on it, and finally 
grew so violent, that John Maclvor and Joseph 
Marcou, attendents at Waverley, were called in to 
lead the roaring Lyon away, much to the amuse- 
ment of the audience. 

Next, the celebrated Arthur Johnson Harmonica 
Band appeared on the stage. In this band were 
some of the world's premier players, the most 
prominent being John Bresnahan, Ernest Ciarletta, 
R. Cormier, James Miani, and Vincent Sumner. 
They played several numbers which were well re- 
ceived, then as an encore the band played one of 
the director's own compositions, "HOW CAN 
SHE SLEEP IN BED, WHEN THERE'S SO 
MUCH OF HER ON THE BUREAU?" 

For the concluding number the entire act joined 



in a song and dance. The lights were dimmed 
again, the screen lowered, and the coming attrac- 
tions were flashed upon the silver sheet. Teamed 
together for the first time, were Albert Perna and 
Louise Rutter in a brilliant story written by Stanley 
Nedza and William Nay for the Mulrean Studios. 
In a few short scenes, Louise and Albert were 
shown together, first, in the opium den of Omi 
Khan, portrayed by Santo Orifice; next, in the 
hanging gardens of the Sultan, Louis Milesky, 
where at the command of the Sultan's favorite 
wife, Lillian Spencer, they are to be sacrificed. 
However, Captain MacDonald of the U. S. Ma- 
rines, saves the day with his Three Musketeeres, 
Private Muise, Poirier, and Myshrall, battle with 
the Sultan's armed guard of 600, led by Edmund 
Noke, and defeat them. The last scene showed 
the Sultan fleeing with several of his wives, por- 
trayed by Eleanor MacDougal, Mary Hoarde, Eliza- 
beth Hornbeck, and Pauline Manning. 

Now the feature picture was projected upon the 
screen. The locale of the play was in Ireland, 
where the hero, Harold Boor, was tending pigs. 
As the movie opened, Harold and the farmer's 
daughter, Carolyn Brehm, were making love in the 
pigsty, when the Traveling Salesman, Vincent 
Bryson, appeared. Stroking his waxed moustache, 
he hissed, "Be mine, proud beauty, or else — heh, 
heh!" 

Harold then rose from among the pigs and ex- 
claimed, 

"Unhand her, cur." 

Vincent, defeated, picked up his case of Fuller 
Brushes and slunk away. The next scene showed 
a quiet evening at home. Farmer Brown, James 
Bonomo, was reading the Good Book, his wife, 
Marie Boulton, knitting, and Carolyn making a 
sampler, while her lover, Harold, was still with 
the pigs. Suddenly there came a knock at the door, 
and Carolyn jumped up to answer it. Opening 
the door, she found herself confronted with the 
traveling salesman, who grasping her by the waist, 
carried her off to tie on the railroad tracks. 

Meanwhile, Harold had returned, only to find 
his love gone. Getting out his bicycle, he pedaled 
to the police station. Chief Curran's wife, Made- 
line Curran, informed our hero, that the police 



THE MIRROR, 1934 



were having a convention, and the chief and the 
entire force would not be home till next week. 
Harold explained his plight to her, and Madeline 
said that she would help by getting some of her 
friends to rescue Carolyn. She hastily called up 
the members of the bridge club, telling them to 
come to her house immediately. As they assem- 
bled, I recognized girls who had once been my 
class-mates in Waltham High. There was Ruth 
Johnson, whose marriage to LaRosee the Hairpin 
King startled Hollywood ; there, Lillian McCauley, 
there, Helen McCarthy, President of the Holly- 
wood Society for the Superannuation of the Poor, 
and there Eleanor Miele, Hollywood's best-dressed 
actress. They started out on their bicycles, follow- 
ing the road that ran parallel to the railroad tracks. 
Suddenly they saw on the tracks, a figure in white 
. . . they pedaled furiously . . . the twelve o'clock 
limited whizzed around the curve, bearing down 
upon our heroine, while Bryson sneered. Then 
the unexpected happened. The engineer of the 
train, John Rando, looked at his watch. 

"Say," he called to his fireman Clarence LaMont, 
"we're an hour ahead of time. We've entirely for- 
gotten about Daylight Savings. You remember, 
it ended yesterday." 

"That's right," agreed Clarence. "Then let's stop 
here and eat our lunch." 

The emergency brake was applied, and they 
stopped two feet away from the helpless Carolyn. 
By this time the women and Harold had arrived. 
Placing their bicycles against a tree, they hurried 
over to Bryson, and soon had him in their clutches. 
Our hero and heroine were thus reunited, and the 
last that we see of them, they are going home to 
raise little pigs. 

With the ending of the picture, the show was 
ended. Frederic grasped my arm and suggested 
that we go back-stage to see some of our class- 
mates. Little did I realize his motive, for Freddie 
had fallen in love with Fannie G. Mahoney. This 
trip back-stage was the beginning of a whirl-wind 
courtship, that would end in his marriage two 
weeks hence. Behind the curtain we saw some 
more of our old friends. There was Richard 



Buckley, head electrician, with his assistant, Albert 
Weiner ; there was Rosalie Cron, personal maid to 
one of the stars; Madeline Mogan, we found, 
was Mistress of the Wardrobe; the promp- 
ter was no other than George Dolber; Robert 
Lawson was the curtain puller; Tullio Iodice was 
the stage sweeper; and among the stage hands, 
who were busily setting up scenery, we saw 
Thomas Girolamo, Roland Gibson, Arthur Derby- 
shire, and Herbert Johnson. As Frederic wished 
to go out and dine with his "little lambie" as he 
called Fannie, I was left alone, in the theatre. As 
my day of recreation ended, the work of the scrub- 
women was just beginning. With their hair tied 
in tight knots, their skirts pinned up, they plodded 
into the theatre, to clean the remains of Leonard's 
Lasting Lucious Gum off the chairs, and slop dirty 
water over the dirty floors. The janitor, Clement 
Gallagher, told me that these women were em- 
ployed for fifteen cents an hour, and their main 
reason for accepting this miserable wage was that 
they wished to be near the theatre. Suddenly I 
found something familiar in the walk on one of 
the charwomen. That was Josephine Hamilton! 
After going over and speaking to her, I discovered 
that her companions were Jennie Hebert, Gratia 
Harrington, Frances D'Orazio, Theresa DeMarco, 
and Aureta Cuniffe. We conversed for some time, 
and I found out that Josephine was married to 
Jack Wilber, and her daughter was teaching in the 
exclusive LUCY HOLTON SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS. She told me that Theresa had had four 
husbands, but divorced them all. The first, Fran- 
cis Dinsmore, had trumped her ace; the second, 
Caldwell Gannon, stayed out all night; the third, 
Wilfred Dufresne, criticized her make-up ; and the 
fourth, Robert Bowman, who was now married to 
Margaret Harris, kept all the bed-clothes on his 
side. After a lenghty conversation, which was 
broken up by the manager, John Lane, I left. I 
said goodbye to the night watchman, Anthony 
Giardina, who then turned out the lights, leaving 
the Burt Theatre in total darkness, leaving it a 
place of mystery, haunted by the memory of my 
friends. 

Harold Burke. 



THE MIKKOK, 1934 



Class Will 



To Whom It May Concern: 

Be it known that we, the class of 1934, of the 
Waltham Senior High School, and lately the most 
prominent social lights, etc., of that establishment 
being of sound mind and in full possession of our 
faculties, and capable of disposing of property, in 
view of the uncertainties of life do hereby appoint, 
transfer, bequeath, and devise our estate as follows: 

To the class of 1935, we leave a loving, kindly, 
and understanding parent, (Mr. Burke) who is 
always ready and willing to dismiss pupils for no 
reason at all. Perhaps these new Seniors will not 
take advantage of Mr. Burke as we did, or thought 
we did. 

To our class President, Raymond Tenanty, we 
leave a book of addresses and telephone numbers, 
all of which he should find useful in keeping his 
dates straight. A "hot tip" to go with that is 
Wal. 1532; that's thrown in extra, Ray. 

A much torn and battered contract is given to 
Carolyn Brehm and Albert Perna to play the lead- 
ing roles in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Along 
with the contract goes a bouquet of American 
Beauties to Miss Brehm sent by an unknown ad- 
mirer who thinks that Carolyn should have honors 
as the best looking girl, but — you know — A large 
bunch of carrots is given to "Boots" Perna, sent 
by Babe Fahey who thinks that the Carioca is a 
disease. 

George Dolber is given a big hand by the 
class and all the luck in the world. We had 
planned to give George a scholarship, but seeing 
that he already earned one from Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute, we wish him success. Congrat- 
ulations, George. 

Derwood Frost has so frequently expressed his 
desire to play shortstop, that we leave him a berth 
on the varsity and a bequest, the interest of which 
will enable him to get a new baseball suit for 
every game. Derwood must keep up his reputa- 
tion, you know. 

To Alphonse, ("Fofo" to you) Collura we do- 
nate a Browning Machine Gun Unlike other bad 
men, "Fofo", we figured, needed something more 
than a few guns. We hope that he can manage 



to get by with the machine gun. Just one teacher 
a day, "Fofo". 

To Harold Burke we leave a year's subscription 
to Ballyhoo and Laffs so that he may be cheerful 
all the time. Feeling generous and having lots of 
money, we also give Harold a weight reducing 
machine in order that he may lose about 100 lbs. 
of avoirdupois. 

To Lawrence Harrigan we allow the opportunity 
of corning back to school another year, and be a 
great help to Coach Jack Leary. We also give 
"Larry" a medal for each sport he has participated 
in. 

To Judith Waterhouse we donate a complete 
wardrobe of the latest Parisian clothes, so that she 
may be as stunning when out of school as she 
was while in school here. 

Dorothy Furbush is the receiver of a round-trip 
ticket to Poughkeepsie where the Olympics of 
1937 will be held. The Class of '34 feel sure that 
"Dot" will take the place of "Babe" Didrickson 
and also set a few new records for women athletes. 

To Harold Davis we bequeath the ever fa- 
vorite novel — This is the House that Jack Built 
with the understanding that when Stephen grows 
up, he will furnish and decorate it according to 
his own conception. 

Mr. Leary will find that we leave him a crowd 
of large and ambitious prospects who will work 
hard to put out winning teams. These boys also 
promise to be honest and not take home suits or 
equipment that does not belong to them. 

To the heavily moustached fellow in Room 5 
(Mr. Hodge) we bestow a flower catalogue which 
v/e believe will be handy to him in his favorite 
hobby of growing flowers. We also want to 
thank him for the accommodation of frequent 
rides to Watertown when we were "thumbing" 
to town. 

Miss Marcher receives an iron-tipped pencil 
with the hopes that it will bring results when she 
taps on her desk. We also leave a sign which we 
believe will be helpful in keeping order and quiet 
in the library. 

To Ruth Johnson we award a complete and 



THE IIEEOR, 1934 



unique wardrobe of newly designed bathing suits 
in which she may compete for the New England 
Beauty Contest. We also bestow upon Ruth a 
diamond studded gold brush and comb with which 
she may keep her beautiful blonde hair looking 
like Ann Harding's. 

We donate to Margaret Harris a modernistic 
mahogany desk and chair and also leave her the 
choice of being President of Wellesley College or 
Chief Executive Secretary of the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Co., as recognition of 
her fame in Waltham High as most studious and 
the most likely to succeed. 

Last but not least the class of '34 with the kind 
permission of the faculty leave to our class clown, 
William Archdeacon, a half ton of blank white 
paper which is to be used in compiling the new 
"Archdeacon Unabridged Dictionary" that will be 
used in all high schools and colleges because of 
its sensible and easily understood explanations. 

To the Commercial Department we donate a 
sum of money which is to be used only on oc- 
casions when the Commercial Course goes in the 
"hole", which isn't often. We also leave them 
a full room of noiseless typewriters so that it will 
not interfere with the pupils talking to one 
another. 

To the English Department we leave a Mimeo- 
graph and Ditto machine so that the teachers will 



follow Miss Allen's method and have all their 
work stenciled on yellow paper. A good way of 
saving a lot of writing on blackboards, eh! what? 

And to the unfortunate teachers who have had 
the misfortune of having the 4D1B Division we 
leave the happy thought that none of the eleven 
culprits will return. We also want to warn the 
4DlB boys that if they continue with the same 
conduct when they get out of school as when they 
were in school, they will be unsuccessful in life. 

We give and bequeath to our beloved faculty 
a large, handsomely built model of our future 
high school which was constructed by the promis- 
ing architects of the Trade School. This model 
is to be placed in the school library with the hope 
that the inquisitive freshmen will not pester Miss 
Marcher to death with silly questions as "When 
are they going to build it?" "Is it going to have 
a gym?" "Where will it be located?" etc. 

As our co-executors, we appoint Miss Wood- 
ward, Mr. Ward, and Miss Rigby to carry out our 
will as per ordered. 

In testimony whereof, we set our hand, ordain- 
ing and declaring this to be our last will and testa- 
ment, this sixth day of June, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand, nine hundred and thirty-four, 
and of the independence of the United States of 
America the one hundred and sixtieth. 

Armand P. LaRosee. 



Exchanges 



TO THE: 

The Ferncliff Echo, Lee 

The Sea Chest, Nantucket 

The Enterprise, Keene 

The Newtonite, Newton 

The Lawrencian, Lawrence 

The Kuay Weekly, Seattle 

The Reflector, Woburn 

The Radiator, Somerville 

The Earle Trainer, Lawrence 

The Tradesman, Boston 

The Rindge Register, Cambridge 

The Brown and Gold, Haverhill 

The Cambridge Review, Cambridge 

The Pilgrim, Plymouth 



The time has come when we must say fare- 
well. We have decided to close our literary year 
with this Year Book. Therefore we take this op- 
portunity to thank everyone of you for sending 
us your school publication. We have found them 
all very interesting and have come to know what 
our contemporaries are doing in their respective 
high schools. We hope that our successors on the 
Mirror Staff will find you as interesting friends 
as we have. 

Frederic Joslyn, 
Exchange Editor. 



! ! 

I I 

' IT'S NOT TOO LATE j 

! j 

! to start planning what you are going to do after you grad- j 

! uate from High School. College may be one of the possi- [ 

bilities, but you might continue the thought further and j 

plan what you want to be doing five years after you are j 

out of High School. j 

( 

j Consult your Vocational Director about the various ca- 

{ reers and their possibilities. Business is one of the main 

j ones, and in times like these a great deal of preparation is 

| necessary before entering it. Yes, a broad education is 

| advisable, and then a training for some special phase. j 

j i 

j That's why it's not too early to start planning, and that's ) 

\ why we invite you to come in to talk the matter over with j 

j one of the officers of this school. We would be very glad j 

| to give you our suggestions as to what courses to take to ( 

( best prepare for your chosen line of business. If you have J 

I no choice we might be able to help you decide. j 

i i 

| At any rate we hope that it may be convenient for you to j 

\ come in (we do not employ any outside salesmen or can- j 

| vassers) to the school at the corner of Boylston and j 

| Arlington Streets, to talk over your plans for the future. j 

j Or, write or phone L. O. White, Principal, Bryant & Strat- j 

| ton Commercial School, 334 Boylston Street, Boston. 

i 
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MARY'S 
SWEET SHOPPE 

CANDIES OF DISTINCTION 

384 Moody Street 
Waltliam, Mass. 

Prop., MARY PEPPEN 
Tel. Waltham 1935 



MINNIE'S 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

397 Moody Street 

Tel. Waltham 1893 

PERMANENTS! 

Minnies Special Complete $1.95 

Frigidin Special Complete $3.00 

Frederics Special Complete $4.50 



i 



ERNEST C. RITCEY 

446 MOODY STREET 

Tel. Waltliam 4323 

889 MAO STREET 

Tel. Waltham 1871-R 

THE UP-TO-DATE 
FISH MARKET 



I THE CHILDREN'S SHOP 

425 3IOODY STREET 

K. C. Rurbank Grace Rose 

Formerly with Grover Cronin 

Feature for June 
Girls' Sport and Tennis Dresses 









INSURE IN SURE INSURANCE 



For Action See 



WOODWARD & TYLER 



844 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 



I ♦**»-«»•<. -<™»- 






^(>«»[)4«».i>-l^n4H^i>«»nH^ii-«»|]<^ii'C»(^ 



••"-^■K'-^^-.H 



WALTHAM SHOE 
REPAIRING 

395 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

BIRD CAGES 

and 

GOLD FISH 

FOR SALE 



CLASS MOTTO 

QUIEN SABE? WHO KNOWS? 



Perhaps a crazy class motto ; but we're proud of 
it. We think we're right. Of course some com- 
plicated Latin or Greek phrase might sound better 
but after all, what more appropriate title, what 
other idea would apply so aptly to the lives of the 
young high school graduates, youngsters who will 
soon be shifting for themselves in a world whose 
stability is far from sure. 

No one realizes better than ourselves the step 
before us, the giving up of the easiest life in the 
world. Without responsibility, without the least 
bit of planning or providing for ourselves, we 
have been happy and contented during our school 
years, so much so that I doubt whether we may 
ever be as happy again. We have true friends 
now; we hope we may have them always, but we 
know we shall not. 



We go forth with high hopes and with a firm 
purpose of reaching the top. We are due for 
bitter reverses and disappointments; humiliation 
and discouragement may get the better of us, but 
we must realize that these things are the compo- 
nents of life. As yet we have not lived. We have 
merely been receiving the foundation for living. 
Our experiences in life must necessarily be more 
difficult than our preliminary training. 
"We must not hope to be mowers, 
And to gather the ripe gold ears, 
Until we have first been sowers 

And watered the furrows with tears." 

May we struggle for our own success, may we 

fight for our own happiness, may we strive to 

carry out our ideals ; but most of all, may we have 

the blessings of God to carry us on. Quien sabe? 

Raymond Tenanty. 






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WALTHAM PHARMACY 

757 MOODY STREET 
Waltham, Mass. 

Medicines — Candy 

We deliver orders 






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621-629 Woody SUmthamSUr 



GRAY'S FURNITURE 
CO., INC. 

621 MOODY STREET 




FOR A JOLLY 
VACATION 

Camp Winnecunnet for girls 
Martha's Vineyard, Mass. 

Schoolgirls' Camp Season 

June 27 — July 11 

Tents and a Vacation House on a 

high bluff in the pines. 
Salt water swimming — Archery — 
Tennis — Nature lore — Crafts — Danc- 
ing — Dramatics — Trails — Beach 
Fires — Land and Sea trips. 

For Folder: Y.W.C.A. Camp Director 
140 Clarendon Street, Boston 






CANDYLAND SHOP 

LUNCHEON 

HOME-MADE CANDIES 

HOME-MADE ICE CREAM 

475 MOODY STEEET 
Waltham, Mass. 



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C. F. CASHMAN 

Bicycles and Supplies — Tires, Tubes and Accessories — 
Lawn Mowers and Skates Sharpened — Tennis Rackets Re- 
strung — Carriage and Tricycle Tires Put On 

462 MOODY STREET WALTHAM 



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May Hemenway 

Electric Needle Specialist 

All Branches of Beauty Culture 

637 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 

Tel. Wal. 3638 



George E. Olson \ 



MEN'S SHOP 



Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



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■'♦ \ 



E. E. BUTMAN 

PHARMACISTS 

CORNER MOODY AND CHESTNUT STREETS 
WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



ANDERSON 



FLORIST 



294 MOODY STREET 



WALT HAM 



Telephone Waltham 1843 



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DO YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE? 

PERMANENT WAVING 

OF DISTINCTION REQUIRES SKILLED ARTISTRY 
A PERMANENT WAVE SHOULD MEAN 

PERMANENT LOVELINESS 



JOSEF'S SUPERB 

PERMANENTS 
$5 - $7 

OIL PERMANENTS 
$10 




jolort cfe ueauit 



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25 c /c Reduction on 



$5 - $7 and $10 



Permanents 



at 9 o'clock 



appointments 



HAIR STYLIST 

MERCANTILE BLDG. CENTRAL SQ. WALTHAM 0057 



Waltham public w 

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§-< >*■»■< i«»o-a»o«»i)«»( «*» 



Waltham Tavern 

At Moody Street Bridge 



Compliments of 

Embassy Theatre 

Wm. Hartnett, Mgr.